Home pageHelp pagePreferences page
Search for specific termsBrowse alphabetical list of titlesBrowse by original filename

Thrifty Meals for Two: Making Food Dollars Count 1985 -- Human Nutrition Information Service Home...
Open this page in a new windowDon't highlight search terms

Thrifty Meals for Two: Making Food Dollars Count
1985
--
Human Nutrition Information Service
Home and Garden Bulletin 244, USDA, 1985.
70 pages
Issued December 1985

Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations.

The PDF file was provided courtesy of the National Agricultural Library.

Scroll down to view the publication.
Agricultural Network Information Center



r Tito:
Makflig Feed Dqflars Ctfunt

THRIFTY MEALS FOR TWO:
MAKING FOOD DOLLARS COUNT
Home and Garden Bulletin Number 244
Contributing Authors: Mary Doran Evans and
Linda Eddy Cleveland
Recipe Development: Guidance and Education
Research Branch Laboratory
Human Nutrition Information Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
December 1985

CONTENTS
12
TWO WEEKS OF
THRIFTY MENUS

This section shows two weeks of
nutritious menus for an older
couple with a very limited food
budget.
IDEAS USED IN THE
THRIFTY MENUS
This section shows five ideas used
to make menus low in cost.
YOUR OWN THRIFTY
MEALS
This section shows how to plan
your own low-cost menus with
good nutrition in mind. It shows
how to get needed nutrients and
avoid too much fat, sugar, and
salt. There's a list of low-cost
foods, too.
ATTHE STORE 21
This section shows shopping skills
to help you get the best buys on
foods. It includes information on
unit pricing, comparing costs,
reading labels, and more.
RECIPES 2!
This section has 41 delicious, low-
cost recipes for two.

INTRODUCTION
Serving nutritious meals on a very
limited income is not easy. If you fix
food for only one or two people, you
may have found that keeping food
costs down is really hard. This bulletin
can help you take charge and save
money without serving dull meals or
wasting food. It can help you save
time and energy as well.
With planning and shopping know-
how, you can serve nutritious,
economical meals for two. This
bulletin tells how. It shows two weeks
of sample menus for an adult
couple—a man and woman in their
fifties or older—and includes menu
planning and shopping ideas, too. The
sample meals and menu planning tips
can help you to plan nutritious, good-
to-eat meals, choose economical
foods, save time in the kitchen, and
add variety to meals.

TWO WEEKS
THRIFTY
MENUS
There are ways to provide nutritious
meals for two while keeping food
costs down. To do it you'll need to
know what kinds of food to serve and
how to combine them into low-cost
meals. We planned two weeks of
menus to start you off. Recipes for
many of the dishes are given at the
end of this bulletin. These menus are
easy on the budget and are planned to
provide the protein, vitamins, and
minerals that an adult couple 50 years
of age and older needs. Fat, sugar,
and salt are limited. If you use food
stamps, the menu ideas can help you
use them wisely.
The menus here are for people who
are healthy. Good eating can help
keep you healthy and even improve
your health. However, these menus
may not be right for people who need
special diets because of diseases.

THRIFTY MEALS FOR TWO: WEEK 1
Amounts to serve for two people are
shown in parentheses after most of the
foods on the menu. The recipes for
the foods in bold print are at the back
of this bulletin. Serving sizes are
shown on the recipes.
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Orange (1)
Ready-to-eat
cereal (3 oz)
Toast (3 si)
Milk (2 c)
Grapefruit
juice (1 c)
Eggs (2)
Toast (4 si)
Bacon (1/4 Ib)
Banana (1)
Oatmeal
(1 c dry)
Toasted drop
biscuits (3)
Milk (2 c)
Grapefruit juice
(1 c)
Cornmeal
pancakes
Syrup (4 T)
Banana (1)
Oatmeal
(1 c dry)
Muffins (3)
Milk (2 c)
Orange (1)
Ready-to-eat
cereal (3 oz)
Quick bread
(4
si)
Milk (2 c)
Grapefruit
juice (1 c)
Scrambled
eggs (2) on
toasted
hamburger
rolls (2)
Braised turkey
(6 oz) with
gravy
Baked potatoes
(2 med)
Col lards
(1/2 10-oz
pkg)
Drop biscuits
(2)
Chocolate
pudding
Turkey-potato
salad on
lettuce
leaves (2)
Drop biscuits
(3)
Grilled cheese
(4oz)
sandwich (2)
Carrot sticks
(about 1
carrot)
Taco salad
Toasted peanut
butter snack
loaf (4 si)
Split pea soup
(2-2/3 c)
Cottage cheese
(1 c) on
lettuce
leaves (2)
Crackers (24)
Hamburger
(1/2
Ib)
on roll (2)
Hot potato
salad
Split pea soup
(2-2/3 c)
Tomato (1),
bacon
(1/4 Ib),
and lettuce
(2 leaves)
sandwich (2)
Cheeseburger
with bacon
on ham-
burger roll
(2 oz cheese,
1/2
Ib
ground beef,
1/4 Ib bacon,
2 rolls)
Banana (2)
Bean tamale
pie
Lettuce (1/3 Ib)
wedge with
dressing (2 T)
Crackers (24)
Peanut butter
snack loaf
(4
si)
Turkey Spanish
rice
Collards
(1/2 10-oz
Pkg)
Apple (1)
wedges
Toast (2 si)
Peanut butter
snack loaf
(4
si)
Liver and
onions
Noodles
(2 c dry)
Lettuce (1/3 Ib)
wedge with
dressing (2 T)
Toasted ham-
burger rolls
(2)
Beef and
peppers
Rice (1/3 c dry)
Chopped
broccoli
(1/2 10-oz
pkg)
Apple cobbler
(half)
Pork chops
with stuffing
Mashed
potatoes
(2 med)
Lettuce (1/3 I b)
wedge with
dressing (2 T)
Muffins (3)
Braised beef
with noodles
Chopped
broccoli (1/2
10-oz pkg)
Apple (1)
wedges
Quick bread
(4
si)
Toast (4 si)
with peanut
butter (2 T)
Ready-to-eat
cereal (3 oz)
Milk (2 c)
Cornmeal
chips
(22)
Muffins (2)
Milk (2 c)
Quick bread
(4
si)
Apple cobbler
(half)
Ready-to-eat
cereal (3 oz)
Milk (2 c)

THRIFTY MEALS FOR TWO: WEEK 2
Amounts to serve for two people are
shown in parentheses after most of the
foods on the menu. The recipes for
the foods in bold print are at the back
of this bulletin. Serving sizes are
shown on the recipes.
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Banana (1)
Ready-to-eat
cereal (3 oz)
Toast (2 si)
Milk (2 c)
Orange (1)
quarters
Oatmeal
(1 c
dry)
Drop biscuits
(2)
Milk (2 c)
Banana (1)
Ready-to-eat
cereal (3 oz)
Toasted quick
bread (2 si)
Milk (2 c)
Orange (1)
quarters
Scrambled eggs
with cheese
(2
oz)
Toast (4 si)
Grapefruit (1)
halves
Ready-to-eat
cereal (3 oz)
Toasted quick
bread (2 si)
Milk (2 c)
Orange (1)
quarters
Oatmeal
(1 c
dry)
Muffins (2)
Milk (2 c)
Grapefruit (1)
halves
Eggs (2)
Bacon (1/4 I b)
Toasted ham-
burger rolls
(2)
Roast pork
(4.5 oz) with
gravy
Baked potatoes
(2 large)
Celery salad
Drop biscuits
(3)
Pork and
cabbage
soup
Toast (2 si)
Pork (4.5 oz)
sandwich (2)
Bean vegetable
combo
Barbecue beef
sandwich
Potato salad
Cheese (2 oz)
and bacon
(1/4 Ib)
sandwich (2)
Stove-top
beans (2 c)
Carrot-raisin
bars (6)
Cottage
cheese-
vegetable
sandwich
Apple (1) slices
Bread pudding
(1 0
Cheeseburger
on roll
(4 oz
cheese, 1/2
Ib ground
beef, 2
hamburger
rolls)
Creole beans
Pear (1) slices
Braised
chicken
rolls
Boiled potatoes
(2
med)
Chopped kale
(1/2
10-oz
Pkg)
Quick bread
(4
si)
Ground beef
(1/2 Ib)
patties
Macaroni and
cheese salad
Celery sticks
(about 1-1/2
stalks)
Drop biscuits
(3)
Sweet and sour
meatballs
(on rice)
Mixed
vegetables
(1 c)
Quick bread
(4
si)
Chicken
macaroni
stew
Chopped kale
(1/2
10-oz
pkg)
Muffins (3)
Bread pudding
(1 c)
Meatballs in
sauce with
rice
Green beans
(1 0
Garlic rolls (2)
(use
hamburger
rolls)
Carrot-raisin
bars (6)
Pizza
Pear (1) slices
Grilled frank-
furter slices
(8
oz)
on
noodles
(1-1/4 c dry)
Stove-top
beans
(2 c)
Apple (1)
slices
Carrot-raisin
bars (6)
Graham
crackers
(6) with
peanut butter
(3T)
Popcorn (1/3 c
dry)
Toast (2 si)
with peanut
butter (2 T)
Carrot-raisin
bars (6)
Milk (2 c)
Graham
crackers
(6) with
peanut butter
(3 T)
Popcorn (1/3 c
dry)
Muffins (3)
Milk (2 c)
5

IDEAS USED
IN
THE
THRIFTY
MENUS
If you like, use the sample menus for
a week or two. Then start to plan your
own menus. To make them low in
cost—
• Choose low-cost foods.
• Use smaller amounts of meat,
poultry, and fish.
• Feature grain products.
• Avoid waste: Plan for leftovers.
• Make your own convenience
mixes.
READ ON TO:
. . . SEE how to use these five
ideas to plan menus and save
money.
6

IDEAS USED IN THE THRIFTY MENUS
CHOOSE LOW-COST FOODS
Low-cost meals do not have to be dull
or lack variety. There are many low-
cost, nutritious foods from which to
choose. In fact, many favorite
American foods are low in cost. These
foods are used in the menus. Some of
them are shown below.
Some foods are not in the menus
because they are both high in cost
and low in nutrients—foods like soda
pop, candy, alcohol, coffee, and tea.
Some convenience foods such as
pastries and frozen dinners aren't in
the menus either. Convenience foods
cost more than similar foods you make
at home. This doesn't mean you can
never have these foods. But to get
nutritious meals at low cost, you want
most of your food money to pay off in
nutrients.
liver- ore. ujsu.
meed" DU.YS.
Noodles
Lettuce wedge
with dressing
Toasted hamburger
rolls
Boca.
("Chopped brocco
Apple cobbler
Chicken macaroni
Qghopped kalej
Muffins""
Bread pudding
Plcun frozen curvL
-^ cost moe.
SeO-Sontnqs oncL
ften

IDEAS USED IN THE THRIFTY MENUS
USE SMALLER AMOUNTS
OF MEAT, POULTRY, AND
FISH
Meat is a good source of several
nutrients, but most meats are more
expensive than other foods. In the
menus, smaller amounts ot lower cost
meats, poultry, and fish are combined
with bread, cereal, rice, pasta, or
potatoes in hearty main dishes. Dried
beans, dried peas, and peanut butter
are used often in casseroles, soups,
salads, and snacks. They provide many
of the same nutrients as meat at lower
cost.
NOON
Pork
sandwich
EVENING
Ground "beef
patties
Macaroni and
cheese salad
Celery sticks
Biscuits
SNACK
<X»SJp
TOO d. <Lol lours
a
Tix
NOON
^——~*->_
Turkey-pot
salad on lettuce"!
Biscuits"
Meed" cxl-Urnoch-s,
mcluulma cookedL
beans otrdL
O.VTE. u.sedL \\'r\\
ways TO oulcL varc'
CLT 'low COST.
Bean tamale
Lettuce wedge with
dressing
Crackers
Peanut hutte!
Toast with
peanut butte
snack loaf
SNACK
Cereal
Milk
8

IDEAS USED IN THE THRIFTY MENUS
FEATURE GRAIN PRODUCTS
Enriched and whole-grain products are
among the most economical sources
of many vitamins and minerals. They
can be a real plus in your diet. The
sample menus may use more of these
foods than you now eat, but you may
be surprised at the different ways they
are used.
Banana.
^ atmeaJ.
<rf pasted biscuits
rilled cheese
sandwi
Carrot sticks
/
EVENING
Turkey Sp
Collards
Die wedges
Toast
merxyLS txse
CosTce*
,X£
e
CjPeanut butter snack loaf
9

IDEAS USED IN THE THRIFTY MENUS
AVOID WASTE:
PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS
Many foods don't come in packages
small enough for two people. Buying
larger packages than you really need
sometimes results in wasted food. And
that means money down the drain. To
avoid waste, try the "planned-over"
idea. "Planned-over" means planning
ahead to buy or prepare amounts of
food that give you servings for more
than one meal. Simply, planning for
FIRST DAT
NOON
^ • •
jtoastpork}
Bafced. potatoes
Qel&ry sjlad
Biscuits
Cheeseburgers on rolls
Creole "beans
Pear slices
leftovers. For example, consider
preparing a recipe for four and serving
it twice. Or try cooking a large cut of
meat or whole chicken. Eat some, and
save the rest to use in other main
dishes. The menus for Week 1 include
planned-over recipes for braised turkey
and beef chuck steak. The menus for
Week 2 include planned-over recipes
for pork roast and braised chicken.
"Planned-over" ideas like the two
from the menus below can help.
Po.ff of OL Z!4.-pouir\\oL
rooLSJ- is served.
r\\ -riv-Si
ns cure saved.
moJce. pov-k and
Soup ar><L ft-
sajruLvsncn ocr

meaJs.
bisc-uils avie.
v-
TWO
or
meas • Leftovers aye.
usea. -H^e next" da.
NEXT DAY
MORNING
Orange quarters
Oaijneal
MUk
NOON
Toast
10

IDEAS USED IN THE THRIFTY
MENUS
MAKE YOUR OWN
CONVENIENCE MIXES
Everyone needs to get meals on the
table fast sometimes. But store-bought
convenience foods can be expensive.
To help solve the problem, you can
make your own low-cost convenience
foods. The biscuit mix recipe on
p.31 is used in the menus to make
muffins, apple cobbler, pizza crust,
and more. This mix will keep up to 3
months in the refrigerator. There are a
pudding mix and a meatball mix, too.
Jhese. Were vjrvxcLe
OL b i SCOUT
See page 31
Pear slices
Braised turkey
with gravy
Baked potatoes
Pollards
Chocoate
Sweet and sour
iitballs (on rice^
Mixed vegetables
Quick bread
These were. wxxdLe -m>m
o. vtveoJ-lxLH
See
This was rrvxde. -Pro*n
Meatballs in sauce
Green beans
Garlic rolls
Carrot-raisin bars
11

YOTJROWMT
THRIFTY
•M"E!AT.fi
The sample meals show ideas to use
in planning nutritious, low-cost meals.
But only you can plan menus that are
exactly right for you. Your menus
should fit your food likes and dislikes
and match your own eating pattern.
The menus should also provide for
any special diet needs you have. Your
own menus can include your favorite
recipes. And they can match your time
and energy and your interest in cook-
ing. With these points in mind, you
can—
• Plan your own economy meals.
• Choose low-cost foods.
• Save cooking time.

YOUR OWN THRIFTY MEALS
START WITH MENU
PLANNING
Planning menus is the first step to
good eating on a budget. There are
some big advantages to making a plan:
A plan can help you take advantage
of special sales.
Check your newspaper for special
sales that fit your budget. Meat, vege-
tables, and fruits can take a big bite
out of your food dollar. Watch for
special sales on these foods and plan
your meals around them.
A plan can help you cut down on
impulse buying at the store.
Do you sometimes go to the store
with a growling stomach, then come
home with foods you didn't really
need? Those impulse buys often aren't
tops in nutrition. Chances are these
foods—like pastries, soda pop, candy,
and snack chips—are high in price and
calories and low in nutrients. Or they
may be expensive convenience foods,
like TV dinners. Impulse buys can
really add to your grocery bill.
A plan can help you avoid waste.
It lets you know the right kind of food
and package size to buy to fit your
needs.
A plan can help you save time.
You won't have to go back to the
store to buy foods you forgot. Save
your time for things you enjoy more.
PLAN YOUR OWN
ECONOMY MEALS
You have seen the economy ideas
used in the sample meal plans. You
know the advantages of planning. But
how can you put it all together into
nutritious meals? Two basic ideas
are—
— Choose a variety of foods.
— Avoid too much fat, sugar, and
salt.

YOUR OWN THRIFTY
MEALS
For variety the meal pattern below
can serve as a guide. But other
patterns are okay, too. Such a meal
pattern helps you get the vitamins and
minerals you need.
Sample
Meal Pattern

Example
from the
Sample Menus

Your Own
Menus

MORNING
Fruit or juice GmpeWuifji
Cereal with
milk, or egg
Bread
juc
on loadedvnoil
NOON
Main dish
Vegetable or
fruit
Bread
EVENING
Main dish
Vegetable
Vegetable or
salad
Cereal or
bread
product
Dessert, if
desired
SNACK
Cereal or
bread
product
Beverage
, bacon <uvL
tertoce.samWic.Vi
Sou
0*1 noodUeS
vocc
*>!,•
Apple vMeAoes
Q
ui
"ReodN -\\o -eat
Ctretxl
Milk
Each day's meals should have foods
from the following food groups—
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.—Foods
in this group give you most of your
vitamins A and C. Vitamin A is
needed for healthy skin. It helps you
see well, too. Vitamin C keeps your
gums healthy, and it helps you resist
infection. Citrus fruits and dark-green
and deep-yellow vegetables are espe-
cially good choices.
Plan to have about four servings
each day. One serving is one-half cup
of fruit or vegetable or one piece,
such as an apple or an orange.
When in season, fresh fruits and
vegetables are often good buys, and
they have little or no fat and no
added sugar or salt. At other times,
frozen and canned fruits and
vegetables may cost less. Some frozen
and canned fruits have sugar added.
Most canned vegetables and seasoned
frozen vegetables have salt added.
BREADS AND CEREALS.-Whole-
grain and enriched breads, cereals,
rice, and pasta are important sources
of B vitamins, which help your body
use the foods you eat for energy.
Breads and cereals also provide iron,
protein, and energy. Whole-grain
products provide fiber that helps pre-
vent constipation.
Economy meals count heavily on
foods from this group. Plan to feature
them at every meal and snack—about
14

YOUR OWN THRIFTY
MEALS
7 to 10 servings a day. One serving is
one slice of bread, one small roll, 1
ounce of ready-to-eat cereal, or 1/2 to
3/4 cup of cooked cereal, rice, or
pasta.
To stretch your food dollar, you can
use grain products as side dishes, and
you can combine them with small
servings of meat, poultry, or fish in
main dishes. Breads, cereals, rice, and
pasta have little or no fat. However,
bakery products such as cookies,
cakes, pies, pastries, and sweet rolls
are high in fat and sugar. You should
limit these foods to special occasions.
MILK AND CHEESE.—Foods in this
group are the best source of calcium—
the nutrient that keeps bones strong.
Many older people get less calcium
than they need.
Try to have about two servings of
milk or cheese every day. One serving
is one 8-ounce cup of milk or 1-1/3
ounces of natural cheese. Or count
3/4 cup of ice cream as a half serving.
To make your food dollars count,
choose from the less expensive forms
of milk. Nonfat dry milk and skim
milk are usually the best buys, and
they have no fat. Low-fat and whole
milk are bargains too, compared with
other milk products such as cheese,
yogurt, ice cream, and ice milk. These
products can add variety to your diet,
but they may cost two to three times
as much as milk for the same amount
of calcium. Many cheeses, yogurts, ice
creams, and ice milks are high in fat
or have sugar in them.
MEATS, DRIED BEANS, PEANUT
BUTTER, AND EGGS.—This group
includes red meats, poultry, fish, dried
beans, dried peas, soybeans, lentils,
eggs, seeds, nuts, and peanut butter.
These foods provide protein, which
helps build and repair skin, bones,
hair, blood, and muscle. These foods
are also good sources of many vita-
mins and minerals like vitamin B
6
and
iron. To use protein properly, you
need vitamin B
6
. For healthy blood,
you need iron. Because different foods
provide different nutrients, it's a good
idea to vary your choices within this
group to get all the nutrients you
need.
Include about two servings from this
group every day. The sample menus
and the recipes at the back of this
bulletin can give you an idea of how
much to use for two people.
Dried beans and peas and peanut
butter are less expensive than many
meats, poultry, and fish. Eating peanut
butter and dried beans and peas some
of the time will also add variety to
your meals. To lower the amount of
fat in meals, choose lean types of
meat most often.
15

YOUR OWN THRIFTY MEALS
To avoid too much fat, sugar,
and salt, know where to look.
FAT in the diet comes from two
sources:
• Fats are found naturally in
some foods, like whole milk, cheese,
nuts, seeds, meats, poultry, fish, and
chocolate.
• Fats are added to your diet
when you use butter, margarine, lard,
drippings, mayonnaise and other salad
dressings, shortening, and gravies.
To cut down on the level of fat in
your diet—
• Choose low-fat foods more often.
• Fix foods the low-fat way. Trim fat
from meats. Remove skin from
poultry. Bake, boil, or broil instead of
frying. Season vegetables with herbs
and spices instead of butter or
margarine.
• Go easy on fats added at the table.
Limit the amount of butter, margarine,
or salad dressing you use.
SUGAR has many names—syrup,
molasses, and honey are some of
them. Candy, jam, jelly, and many soft
drinks are mostly sugar, too. Sugars
are high in calories and low in
nutrients. There are few of them in the
sample menus. Try limiting them in
your menu plan.
Much of the SALT in our diets is
added to foods in cooking and at the
table. Try using less table salt and
eating less salty foods. Many of these
foods have salt in them:
Canned and instant soups
Processed food such as
prepared meals and rice or
noodle mixes
Seasoning mixes
Sauces such as barbecue and soy
sauce
Snack foods such as salted chips and
pretzels
The sample menus have few of these
foods.
16

YOUR OWN THRIFTY
MEALS
CHOOSE LOW-COST FOODS MOST OF THE TIME.
TO SAVE MONEY.
The foods listed here are usually
among the best buys in each food
group. Use any other foods that you
produce at home, get free, or can buy
for no more than the foods on this list.
VEGETABLE-FRUIT GROUP
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Corn, cut
Cucumbers
Green beans
Kale
Lettuce
Mustard greens
Onions
Potatoes
Sauerkraut
Bean sprouts, fresh
Turnip greens,
canned
Tomatoes, canned
Sweet potatoes and
yams, fresh
Apples
Bananas
Oranges
Grapefruit
Pears, fresh
Tangerines
Applesauce
Fruit juices
including
orange,
grapefruit,
apple, grape,
pineapple, and
prune
Buying tips:
• Watch for good buys on fresh fruits
and vegetables in season.
• Buy plain canned or plain frozen
vegetables instead of those with added
seasonings and sauces or boil-in-the-
bag packages.
• Look for large bags of frozen
vegetables. They may be bargains and
you can pour out the exact amount
you need.

YOUR OWN THRIFTY MEALS
BREAD-CEREAL GROUP
Cornmeal
Flour
Rolled oats
Grits
Farina
Many ready-to-eat cereals such as
corn, wheat, and bran flakes, puffed
rice and oat cereals, and shredded
wheat
Breads
Hamburger or hot dog rolls
Saltines
Popcorn, unpopped
Rice
Macaroni, spaghetti
Noodles
Buying tips:
• Choose whole-grain or enriched
products for good nutrition.
• Buy cereals in large boxes instead
of small, individual packages.
• Look for bargains on day-old bread
and bakery products.
• Add your own seasonings and
sauces to rice and pasta.
• Buy cereals plain, without added
sugar. Add your own sugar if you
don't need to worry about weight.
• Buy regular-type rice and regular- or
quick-type oats, grits, and farina. The
instant types cost over twice as much
per serving.
MILK GROUP
Nonfat dry milk
Fluid milks
Pasteurized process cheese
Pasteurized process cheese spread
and cheese food
Some natural cheeses including
brick, mozzarella, and cheddar
Buying tips:
• Select the largest container you can
use without waste. Larger containers
are usually less expensive.
• Grate cheese yourself. Packages of
shredded cheese cost more than the
same amount of the same cheese in
wedges or blocks.
18

YOUR OWN THRIFTY MEALS
MEAT GROUP
Dried beans
Dried peas
Liver
Ground beef
Beef chuck
roast
Beef chuck
steak
Fresh pork -
Boston butt
and shoulder
Cured pork -
picnic and
ham
Eggs
Peanut butter
Tuna, canned
Cod or perch,
frozen
Frankfurters
Turkey, whole
or drumstick
Chicken, whole
Buying tips:
• Look for specials at the meat
counter. Buying sale cuts can mean
big savings for you. Some higher
priced meats may fit your budget
when they are on sale.
• Cut up meats and chicken yourself.
For example, stew meat usually costs
more than a chuck roast. You can cut
the roast into cubes and save money.
Chicken parts often cost more than
whole chickens, too.
THESE FOODS COST MORE
. . .and some will increase the fat,
sugar, and salt in your diet, too.
Frozen vegetables with seasonings and
sauces
Out-of-season fresh fruits and
vegetables
Ready-made or ready-to-bake cookies,
cakes, pies, and buns
Sugar-coated cereals
Cream, ice cream, cream cheese,
yogurt, and specialty cheeses
Many ready-to-eat dishes
Some cuts of meats, poultry, and fish
Snack foods such as potato, corn, or
cheese chips or puffs
Soft drinks
Candy
19

YOUR OWN THRIFTY MEALS
TIMESAVING STEPS
Not everyone loves to cook. Even
those who enjoy cooking do not
always have the time or the energy.
And buying convenience foods or
eating out can be costly. But there are
ways to eat well at low cost without
spending hours in the kitchen. Again,
planning ahead will help you. Con-
sider these ideas—
• Use the lower cost convenience
foods. Examples of some that are
usually good buys are frozen orange
juice concentrate, canned and frozen
vegetables without seasonings or
sauces, and cake mixes.
• Plan some meals so you will have
leftovers to use for later meals and
snacks. Look at the "planned-over"
ideas from the sample menus for
examples (see page 10 ).
• Do most of your cooking for the
week on one or two days and freeze
or store some of the food. Then enjoy
being able to just heat and eat for the
rest of the week.
• Prepare a recipe for four and freeze
half.
• Try the homemade mixes developed
for the sample menus (see page 11).
MENU PLANNING
CHECKLIST
To make sure you are off to a good
start, review the menu planning
checklist below.
Do your menus
w Include leftovers?
w Use store specials?
w Have a variety of foods?
W Emphasize grain products?
w Rely on economical foods?
Then Make A Shopping List Based on
Your Menus.

AT
THE
STORE
Once you have planned your menus
and made a shopping list, you're
ready to buy the food. The prices you
pay will depend on where and how
you shop. It takes time and effort to
become a food buying expert. But it's
well worth it. To make your food
dollars count—
• Decide where to shop.
• Compare while you shop.
• Keep your shopping skills sharp.
READ OUT TO:
... LEARN" shopping skills that
will get you started and leave
extra money in your pocket.
21

AT THE STORE
DECIDE WHERE
TO SHOP
It's usually best to shop at large super-
markets. They have many brands and
package sizes. This bigger selection of
foods gives you a better chance to
compare prices and find bargains. For
convenience, you may want to limit
your shopping to one or two super-
markets near you. As you become
familiar with a store's usual prices,
you will quickly spot the specials.
BE A COMPARISON
SHOPPER
Shop by comparing costs to find the
foods on your list at the price to fit
your budget. By comparing costs you
may find unadvertised specials that
you'll want to buy instead of similar
foods on your list. To compare costs
you'll need to look at—
• unit prices,
• costs per meal or serving, and
• food labels.
Use Unit Pricing
The unit price is the price per pound,
ounce, quart, or other unit. Most
supermarkets have unit price labels on
the display shelves above or below
canned and packaged foods.
Name, brand, and size of container
PRICE
$2.00
4
UNIT PRICE
$1.17
per pound
fc
A
The, TOTAL PRICE
thar v
padcjq
.
vow.
II pay
4-or -H^i
,NIT PRICE
• Comparinq costs
<tn -tor axhd-s
ounces,
Compare unit prices to find the brand
of food and container size that costs
the least per unit. The "large
economy" size will often have the
lowest unit price. But it may not be a
bargain if some gets thrown out.
Choose the package that best fits both
your meal plan and your budget.

AT THE STORE
1. Compare unit prices for different
brands of food. Which is the better
/'buy?
>tore brand)frozen green beans,
TlPourTce "package
PRICE
$0.68
UNIT PRICE
$1.09
per pound
OR
(flame brancTljrozen green beans,
seasoned, j£ounce package
PRICE
$1.19
UNIT PRICE
$2.12
per pound
The store brand beans at $1.09 per pound
are a better buy than the name brand
seasoned beans at $2.12 per pound.
2. Compare unit prices for foods in dif-
ferent packagejsizes. Which is the bet-
ter buy?
Name brand cornflakes,
"Tff^ounce bo5
PRICE
$1.49
UNIT PRICE
$1.32
per pound
OR
Name brand cornflakes, individual
packs^dunces)(3/4 ounce each)
PRICE
$1.35
UNIT PRICE
$3.60
per pound
The 18-ounce box of cereal at $1.32 per
pound is a better buy than the 6-ounce in-
dividual pack size at $3.60 per pound.
Some stores now sell some foods in
bulk—including flour, sugar, mixes,
cereals, dried beans and peas, nuts,
herbs, and spices. Bulk means you
scoop the amount of food you want
from bins. Because they are not
packaged, bulk foods cost less than
the same foods in packages. But com-
pare the unit price to be sure. Buying
foods in bulk is also a great way to
avoid waste, because you can buy
only what you need.

AT THE STORE
Compare the Cost of a Meal
or a Serving

Some foods have parts you can't eat—
like the bone and fat in meat or the
cores, pits, or peels of fresh fruits and
vegetables. For these foods, the lowest
price per pound isn't always the best
buy. To find the best buy, you need to
compare the costs of the amounts you
need for a meal or for a serving.
From past experience you probably
know how much of these foods you
need for a meal. To find the cost of a
meal:
• First think of how many meals a
package will serve.
• Then divide the number of meals
you expect to get into the price for the
package. This gives you the cost per
meal.
The example below shows how to
compare costs for meats.
At the MEAT counter—
COMPARE THE COST OF A MEAL WHICH IS THE BETTER BUY?
GROUND BEEF
$1.49
Price per
Ib.
.67
Net wt.
Ibs.
TOTAL PRICE
$1.00
2. mea.h ) Total Price
£l.d>o
BEEF RIB
.67
TOTAL PRICE
$1.00
me<U J
Ground beef is the better buy at 504 for a meal.

AT THE STORE
For some foods—especially fruits—it
may be easier to compare the cost of
a serving than the cost of a meal. To
find the cost of a serving:
• First think of the number of servings
you can get from a market unit—such
as a pound of bananas, or five
grapefruits, or one pineapple.
• Then divide the number of servings
into the price for the market unit to
find the cost of a serving.
The example below shows how to
compare costs for fresh fruits.
In the PRODUCE section—
COMPARE THE COST FOR A SERVING.
WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING THREE ARE THE BETTER BUYS?
-L.T J_ pound- or bananas
gives y
ou
- oJooui 3
serviras , -Hicn 30*. 4-c^
OL. pound. 4- 3 servmqs
==
-
lo4 -ror o^ servino,
O
J
IT 5 qroLpefvuitS OIL)- in
<xl? aive v ° - ^ servin
=
10
servinq.
«j
IT i. pineapple,
ai>fcs yoiL ocboaJ-
ser-virtts -Hncn
-r b seryinas
ex. servincn
o
Bananas at 1 pound for 30<t and grapefruits at 5 for $1.00 are the better buys.

AT THE STORE
Read Food Labels
Food labels can tell you a lot about
what's inside the package. To see
what you are really paying for, read
the label.
Look for the list of ingredients. In-
gredients are listed on the package in
order from largest to smallest amounts.
100%
Grape
Juice
INGREDIENTS: (|FtAPE
GRAPE JUICE FROM
TRATE, ASCORBIC ACID (VITAMIN
C). NO ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS OR
COLORS ADDED.
Powdered
Grape
Flavor
Drink
INGREDIENTS: SUGAR, DEX-
TROSE, CITRIC ACID (PROVIDES
TARTNESS), NATURAL AND AR-
TIFICIAL FLAVORS, SODIUM
CITRATE (REGULATES TART-
NESS), DEXTRIN, TRICALCIUM
PHOSPHATE (PREVENTS CAK-
ING), VITAMIN C, CELLULOSE
GUM (ADDS BODY), HYDRO-
GENATED VEGETABLE OIL, ARTI-
FICIAL COLOR.

AT THE STORE
• Look to see if breads, bakery pro-
ducts, rice, flour, and pasta are whole-
grain or enriched.
"Whole-grain" flour
still has most of the nutrients that
were originally in the wheat or other
grain. In making white flour, however,
some of those nutrients are lost.
"Enriched" means that those nutrients
have been put back.
Sometimes you can tell if a food is
whole-grain or enriched from its
name. For other foods, you'll need to
look at the ingredient list.
label tells vote in
4Ke name 4kph -me.
flouv is aU wUaie. -aviain
fc
s
is lake! -klk >/pu \\
name. -Hvx*- '-mis
is
Thi
tt*e
•HioJ-
Iis4- or i
Vou.
m
ierf
is
v<
floav".
INGREDIENTS: I1NRI EACHEDLENRICHED FLOURJ
MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, IRON (FERROUS SULFATE),
NIACIN, THIAMINE (THIAMINE MONONITRATE OR
THIAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE), RIBOFLAVIN, WATER,
CRUSHED WHEAT, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP,
VEGETABLE SHORTENING (PARTIALLY HYDROGE-
NATED SOYBEAN OIL AND/OR PALM OIL). CONTAINS 2
PERCENT OR LESS OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING:
BRAN, YEAST, SALT, CALCIUM SULFATE, DOUGH CON-
DITIONERS (MAY CONTAIN ONE OR MORE OF THE
FOLLOWING: SODIUM STEARCYLLACTYLATE, ETHOX-
YLATED MONO-AND DI-GLYCERIDES, MONOCALCIUM
PHOSPHATE, CALCIUM CARBONATE, POTASSIUM
BROMATE), MONO- AND DI-GLYCERIDES, YEAST
NUTRIENTS (DIAMMONIUM PHOSPHATE AND/OR AM-
MONIUM CHLORIDE OR AMMONIUM SULFATE),
CALCIUM PROPIONATE (ADDED TO RETARD SPOILAGE).
REG. PENNA. DEPT. AGR-L

AT THE STOKE
Look for "No-Brand" Foods
"No-brand" or generic foods usually have
the same nutrients as brand name foods,
but they usually cost less. You can spot
generic foods by their plain white
packages with black lettering. They have
no brand name. They may have plain
packages, but remember, it's what's in-
side that counts! Decide if generics are for
you by comparing their cost and quality
with the brands you normally buy.
KEEP YOUR SHOPPING
SKILLS SHARP
Be alert to the ways foods are
displayed. Watch out for foods placed
at the end of the aisle or in an attrac-
tive display. They may not really be
bargains. Be careful using "cents-off"
coupons, too. Often these coupons are
for name brand products that cost
more than store brand or "no-brand"
products, even with the coupon dis-
count. Be sure to compare costs!
SUN
reat fo
parties

RECIPES
Some two-person families tested and
liked the recipes in the sample menus.
Try them; you may like them too.
Some of these recipes are new. Some
are old favorites. In either case, they
are—
low in cost, since they are made
with economical foods and season-
ings, and
nutritious, since they contain
nutrient-rich foods and avoid too
much fat, sugar, and salt.
You'll find the recipes grouped
here as homemade convenience
mixes, main dishes, salads, soups,
sandwiches, breads, and desserts.
Each recipe gives you the number of
servings, the serving size, and the
calories in a serving.
29

INDEX TO RECIPES
Page
HOMEMADE
CONVENIENCE MIXES
Biscuit mix 31
Meatball mixture 31
Pudding mix 32
MAIN DISHES
Bean tamale pie 33
Beef and peppers 34
Braised beef with noodles . . 35
Braised chicken rolls 36
Braised turkey drumsticks... 37
Braised turkey with gravy . . . 38
Chicken macaroni stew . . . . 39
Creole beans 40
Liver and onions 41
Meatballs in sauce with rice 42
Pizza 43
Pork chops with s t u f f i n g . . . . 44
Roast pork shoulder 45
Roast pork with gravy 46
Stewed chicken 47
Stove-top beans 48
Sweet and sour meatballs... 49
Taco salad 50
Turkey-potato salad 51
Turkey Spanish rice 52
SALADS
Bean-vegetable combo 53
Celery salad 54
Hot potato salad 55
Macaroni and cheese salad . 56
Potato salad 57
SOUPS
Pork and cabbage soup . . . . 58
Split pea soup 59
SANDWICHES
Barbecue beef sandwich . . . 60
Cottage cheese-vegetable
sandwich 61
BREADS
Cornmeal chips 62
Cornmeal pancakes 63
Drop biscuits 64
Muffins 64
DESSERTS
Apple cobbler 65
Bread pudding 66
Carrot-raisin bars 67
Chocolate pudding 68
Peanut butter snack loaf 69
30

Biscuit Mix
About 6 cups mix
Flour, lightly spooned into cup
Instant nonfat dry miiir
Baking powder
Salt

Shortening
4 cups
2/3 cup
% tablespoons
1 teaspoon
cup
Mix dry ingredients thoroughly.
Cut in shortening with pastry
"blender or mixer until fine
crumbs are obtained and
shortening is evenly dispersed.
3. Store in tightly covererd
container in refrigerator. Use
within 3 months.
Meatball Mixture
Regular ground beef
Soft breadcrumbs
Onion, finely chopped
Reconstituted instant nonfat dry

mirk
Salt
1 pound
1/2 cup
2 tablespoons
1/3 cup
1/4 teaspoon
1. Mix ingredients thoroughly.
2. Divide mixture in half. Use half
for Sweet and Sour Meatballs
(p. 49), or Meatballs in Sauce
(p.
42).
3. Wrap and freeze remaining
portion for later use.
31

Pudding Mix
About 2-1/2 cups mix
Instant nonfat dry milk
Gornstarch.
Sugar
Salt
2-1/3 cups
1/2 cup
1/2 cup

1/4 teaspoon
1. Mix ingredients thoroughly.
2. Store in tightly covered
container in refrigerator. Use
within 3 months.

Bean Tamale Pie
2 servings of about 1 cup filling
cornmeal mush each
295 calories per serving

Green pepper, chopped
Onion, chopped
Oil
Dried kidney beans, cooked,
Tinsalted, drained*
Tomato puree
Frozen whole-kernel corn
Chili powder
Salt

Yellow cornmeal
Water

Salt
Chili powder

and 1/3 cup
% tablespoons
2 tablespoons

1 teaspoon
1 cup
1/2 cup

about 1 cup (half of a
10-ounce package)
1-1/2 teaspoons
1/8 teaspoon

1/3 cup
3/4 cup
1/16 teaspoon
1/4 teaspoon

1. Cook green pepper and onion in
oil in small (8-inch) frypan
until tender.
2. Stir in beans, tomato puree,
corn, 1-1/2 teaspoons chili
powder, and 1/8 teaspoon salt.
3. Cover and cook over low heat
until flavors are "blended—about
15 minutes.
4. Mix cornmeal, water, and 1/16
teaspoon salt.
5. Cook over low heat, stirring
constantly, until very thick—
about 3 minutes.
6. Spread cornmeal mush over
bean mixture to form a crust.
7. Sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon chili
powder over top of crust.
8. Cook over low heat, with lid ajar,
until topping is set—about 7
minutes.
*NOTE: 1 cup canned kidney beans,
drained, may be used in place of
cooked dried kidney beans; then
omit the 1/8 teaspoon salt in step
2. About 270 calories per serving.
33

Beef and Peppers
2 servings of about 3/4 cup each
230 calories per serving

Beef cubes, from chuck steak*
Tomatoes
Garlic powder
Pepper
Onion, sliced
Green pepper, cut in 1-inch pieces
about 1 cup
half of a 16-ounce can

(about 1 cup)
1/8 teaspoon
dash
1. Brown beef cubes in saucepan
until well browned.
3. Break up large pieces of
tomatoes. Stir in garlic powder
and pepper. Pour over beef.
Cover and cook over low heat
until beef is almost tender-
about 1 hour.
3. Add onion and green pepper.
Cover and continue cooking
until vegetables and beef are
tender—about 30 minutes.
*NOTE: For beef cubes, use a 1-1/2-
pound blade chuck steak. Separate
lean meat from fat and bone. Gat
meat into 3/4-inch cubes. Divide

beef cubes in half. Use half (about 1
cup) for Beef and Peppers. Save

remaining 1 cup for Braised Beef
with Noodles (p. 35>
34

Braised Beef with Noodles
2 servings of 3/4 cap beef mixture and
3/4 cup noodles each
340 calories per serving
Beef cubes, from chuck steak*
Water
Salt
Pepper
Bay leaf

Onion, coarsely chopped
Celery, diced

Flour
Water
Noodles, cooked, unsalted
about 1 cup
1-1/8 cups
1/4 teaspoon

dash
1
1 small

2/3 cup
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon

1-1/2 cups
1. Brown "beef cubes in saucepan
until well browned.
8. Add 1-1/2 cups water, salt,
pepper, and bay leaf. Cover and
cook over low heat until "beef is
almost tender—about 1 hour.
3. Add onion and celery. Continue
cooking until meat and
vegetables are tender—about SO
minutes.
4. Remove bay leaf.
8. Mix flour and water until
smooth. Stir into beef mixture.
Cook, stirring constantly, until
thickened—about S minutes.
6. Serve over noodles.
*NOTE: For beef cubes, use a 1-1/2-
pound blade chuck steak. Separate
lean meat from fat and bone. Gut
meat into 3/4-inch cubes. Divide
beef cubes in half. Use half (about 1
cup) for Braised Beef with Noodles.

Save remaining 1 cup for Beef and
Peppers (p. 34>

Braised
2 servings of I chicken roll
with about 3 tablespoons
gravy each.
240 calories per serving
Chicken breast halves,
skinned and boned*
Onion, chopped
Celery,
chopped
Margarine
Rice, cooked, unsalted
Poultry seasoning

Salt
Pepper

Garlic
powder
Chicken stock
(from
Stewed
Chicken, p. 47, step
4)
Gravy
Flour
Water
Chicken cooking
liquid
(see
step
7 below)
2 tablespoons
2 tablespoons

1 teaspoon
2/3 cup
1/8 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon
dash
dash
8/3 cup
2 teaspoons
1 tablespoon
about 1/3 cup
1. Pound
"breast halves with, meat
mallet
until
flat.
2. Cook
onion
and celery
in
margarine until tender.
3. Mix in
rice and seasonings.
4. Place naif of rice mixture
on
each,
breast
naif. Start
with
narrowest end and roll.
Tie
string around each
end of roll to
hold it together.
Leave ends of
string long so
they can be easily
removed before
serving.
5. Brown chicken
rolls on all sides
in hot frypan.
6. Add stock and
bring to a boil.
Reduce heat,
cover, and simmer
until tender—about
15 minutes.
7. Remove rolls
from cooking
36

RECIPES: MAIN DISHES
liquid. Keep rolls warm while
making gravy.
8. For gravy, mix flour and water
until smooth. Stir into cooking
liquid. Cook, stirring constantly,
•until thickened—about 1 minute.
9. Serve gravy over chicken rolls.
*NOTE: Use chicken breast halves
from a 3-1/3 pound chicken. Use
remaining parts for Stewed Chicken
(P- 47).
Braised Turkey Drumsticks
Provides cooked turkey for 3 meals
Turkey drumsticks, fresh
or frozen
Poultry seasoning
Salt
Pepper

Water
2 pounds
1/8 teaspoon
I/16 teaspoon

dash
cups
1. Thaw frozen drumsticks in
refrigerator.
2. Brown drumsticks in hot
frypan—about 15 minutes.
3. Sprinkle with seasonings.
4. Add water. Bring to a boil.
Reduce heat, cover, and simmer
until tender—about 1-1/2 hours.
Turn drumsticks halfway
through cooking.
5. Measure cooking liquid. Spoon
off as much of the fat layer as
possible. Add water to liquid, if
necessary, to make 1-1/2 cups.
Save 1/2 cup for Braised Turkey
with Gravy (p.38).
6. Separate meat from skin and
bones. Dice and save 2/3 cup
turkey for Turkey Spanish Rice
(p. 52). Dice and save 3/4 cup
turkey for Turkey-Potato Salad
(p. 51). Serve remainder of
turkey for dinner (see Braised
Turkey with Gravy).

Braised Turkey with. Gravy
2 servings of about 3 ounces turkey
and 1/4 cup gravy each.
185 calories per serving
Flour
Water
Turkey cooking liquid (from
Braised Turkey Drumsticks,
p. 37, step 5)

Braised Turkey (from Braised
Turkey Drumsticks, p.37,
step 6)
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon
1/2 cup
about 6 ounces
1. Mix flour and water until
smooth. Stir into turkey cooking
liquid.
2. Cook, stirring constantly, until
thickened—about 2 minutes.
3. Serve over braised turkey.
38

Chicken Macaroni Stew
8 servings of about 1-1/4 cups each
285 calories per serving
Tomatoes
Frozen mixed vegetables
Elbow macaroni, uncooked
Onion, chopped
Oregano leaves

Salt
Garlic powder
Pepper
Bay leaf
Chicken stock (from Stewed

Chicken, p. 47, step 4)
Chicken, cooked, diced (from
Stewed Chicken, p. 47, step 5)
half of a 16-ounce
can (about 1 cup)
about 1 cup (half of a
10-ounce package)
1/3 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 teaspoon
1/4 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

dash
1
1
cup
3/4 cup
1. Breakup large pieces of
tomatoes. Place all ingredients
except chicken into saucepan.
2. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and
"boil gently, uncovered, until
macaroni is tender—about 15
minutes. Stir several times to
prevent macaroni from sticking.
3. Add chicken. Heat to serving
temperature.
4. Remove bay leaf.
39

Creole Beans
2 servings ofl cup each
180 calories per serving
Celery, sliced
Onion, coarsely chopped.
Green pepper, coarsely chopped
Margarine
Tomatoes

Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Dried pea (navy) beans, cooked,
unsalted, drained*
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
1 teaspoon
half of a 16-ounce can
(about 1 cup)
1/8 teaspoon
If 16 teaspoon

dash
1-1/4 cups
1. Cook celery, onion, and green
pepper in margarine until
tender—about 5 minutes.
2. Break up large pieces of
tomatoes. Add tomatoes and
seasonings to cooked vegetables.
Bring to a "boil.
3. Add "beans and return to a "boil.
Reduce heat, cover, and "boil
gently until flavors are "blended
and liquid is reduced—about 30
minutes. Stir occasionally to
prevent sticking.
*NOTE: 1-1/4 cups canned navy
beans, drained, may be used in
place of cooked dried beans; then
omit salt In step 2. About SOS
calories per serving.

40

Liver and Onions
2 servings of about 2-1/2 ounces each
210 calories per serving with beef liver

200 calories per serving with pork liver
Beef or pork liver, sliced,
deveined*
Flour
Oil
Salt
Pepper
Onion, sliced

Water
1/2 pound
1-1/2 tablespoons

1 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

dash
1 small
1-1/2 tablespoons

1. Remove membrane from liver, if
necessary.
2. Coat liver slices with flour.
3. Brown liver on one side in hot
oil in frypan.
4. Turn liver. Add salt and pepper.
Top with onion slices. Add water
and cover pan tightly.
5. Cook over low heat until liver is
tender—about 25 minutes.
*NOTE: If liver was purchased
frozen, partially thaw in the
refrigerator only until slices can be
easily separated Remove 1/2 pound
for recipe; wrap and return
remaining pieces to the freezer. To
maintain, quality, do not completely

thaw liver that is to be refrozen.
If liver was purchased fresh,
freeze any remaining liver for later
use.
41

Meatballs in Sauce with. Rice
2 servings of 6 meatballs, 1/4 cap sauce,
and 3/4 cup rice each

440 calories per serving
Meatball mixture (p. 31)
Tomato puree

Onion, chopped
Vinegar
Sugar
Oregano leaves
Pepper

Water
Rice, cooked, unsalted
1/2 recipe
1/2 cup
1 tablespoon
2 teaspoons
1/2 teaspoon
1/4 teaspoon
dash
2 tablespoons
cups
1. Thaw frozen meatball mixture
in refrigerator.
2. Divide into 12 portions. Shape
into balls.
3. Brown meatballs on all sides in
hot frypan. Drain.
4. Mix remaining ingredients
except rice. Pour over meatballs.
5. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat,
cover, and boil gently until
sauce thickens—about 10
minutes. Spoon sauce over
meatballs once during cooking.
6. Serve over rice.
42

Pizza
(using biscuit mix)
2 servings of 2 wedges each
480 calories per serving

Biscuit mix (p. 31)
Water
Regular ground beef
Oregano leaves

Garlic powder
Tomato puree
Onion, very thinly sliced
Green pepper, cut in very

thin strips
Process American cheese,
shredded
1
cup
3 tablespoons
1/4 pound
1/8 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

1/3 cup
1 small
medium
1/4 cup
1. Preheat oven to 425°F(hot).
2. Lightly grease a baking sheet or
pizza pan.
3. Stir "biscuit mix and water
together until mix is "barely
moistened. Knead 15 times on a
lightly floured surface.
4. Pat or roll dough into an 8-inch
circle on "baking sheet or pizza
pan. Turn up edge of dough
slightly to form a rim.
5. Bake until surface begins to
dry—about 6 minutes.
6. Brown "beef in hot frypan. Drain.
7. Stir oregano and garlic powder
into puree. Spread over hot
crust. Sprinkle with browned
beef, onion, and green pepper
and top with cheese.
8. Bake until cheese is melted and
crust is golden brown—about 15
minutes.
9. Cut into 4 wedges.
43

Fork Chops with Stuffing
2 servings of 2 chop and 3/4 cup stuffing each
360 calories per serving with white bread
350 calories per serving with whole-wheat bread
Blade pork chops
Celery, chopped

Onion, chopped
Soft bread cubes
Apple, unpared, chopped
Poultry seasoning
Pepper
Water
Water

2 (about 8 ounces each)
1/4 cup
1/4 cup

2 cups
1 small (about 3/4 cup)
1/4 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon
8 tablespoons
1/4 cup
1. Trim excess fat from pork
chops.
2. Brown pork chops in hot
frypan. Remove chops and
discard fat.
3. Cook celery and onion in frypan
•until tender. Mix with "bread,
apple, seasonings, and 2
tablespoons water.
4. Place pork chops in frypan. Top
each chop with half of stuffing
mixture.
8. Add 1/4 cup water to frypan.
Cover and cook over low heat
until pork chops are tender-
about 30 minutes. Check pork
chops during cooking; add a
small amount of water, if
needed, to prevent
over-browning.
44

Boast Pork Shoulder
Provides cooked pork for 3 meals
Fresh, picnic shoulder with, bone
-1/2 pounds
1. Place picnic shoulder on rack in
shallow roasting pan. If meat
thermometer is used, insert it in
center of roast so tip does not
touch "bone or fat.
3. Roast, uncovered, at 325°F (slow
oven) until done, about 2-1/2 to
3 hours. To test for doneness,
make a small cut next to "bone
into thicker part of meat. Juices
will "be clear when meat is done.
Meat thermometer, if used,
should read 170°F.
3. Remove fat from drippings.
Defatted drippings will measure
about 2 tablespoons; save half
for Roast Pork with Gravy (p. 46)
and half for Pork and Cabbage
Soup (p. 58).
4. Separate meat from rind, fat,
and bone. Using the smaller
pieces of pork, dice and save 1
cup of meat for Pork and
Cabbage Soup. Slice remaining
meat. Save half for sandwiches
and half for Roast Pork with
Gravy. Cooked pork will keep 3
to 4 days in the refrigerator.
45

Boast Pork with Gravy
2 servings, about 2-1/4 ounces pork
and 1/4 cup gravy each
1 95 calories per serving

Water
Defatted pork drippings (from
Roast Pork Shoulder, p. 48 ,
stepS)

Flour
Boast pork, sliced (from Roast
Pork Shoulder, step 4)
as needed
about 1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon
about 4-1/2 ounces
1. Add water to pork drippings to
make 1/S cup.
3. Stir flour into a small amount of
the liquid until smooth. Add
remaining liquid.
3. Cook, stirring constantly, until
thickened—about 2 minutes.
4. Serve over sliced roast pork.
46

Stewed Chicken
Provides chicken and stock for four meals
Chicken, whole
Onion, quartered
Carrot, cut in pieces

Celery, cut in pieces
Pepper

Water
3-1/3 pounds
1 medium
1 medium
1 stalk
1/8 teaspoon
8 cups
1. Cut up chicken. Remove skin
and. "bones from breast halves.
Save breast halves for Braised
Chicken Rolls (p. 36).
2. Place remaining chicken parts
and. skin and. bones from breast
halves in saucepan.
3. Add. vegetables, pepper, and
water. Bring to a boil. Reduce
heat, cover, and simmer until
chicken is tender—about 45
minutes.
4. Remove chicken and vegetables
from stock. Pour stock into 2-
cup measuring cup. Spoon off as
much of the fat layer as possible.
Press vegetables through a
strainer (or mash with fork)
and add to defatted stock. Add
water to stock, if necessary, to
make 2 cups. Save 2/3 cup stock
for Braised Chicken Rolls (p. 36)
and 1 cup for Chicken Macaroni
Stew (p. 39).
5. Separate meat from skin and
bones. Dice and save 3/4 cup
meat for Chicken Macaroni
Stew.
*NOTE: Only part of the chicken is
used in Week 2 menus. Freeze
remaining cooked meat and stock
for later use.
47

Stove-Top Beans
4 servings of about 1 cup each
295 calories per serving

Dried pea (navy) beans*
Boiling water

Salt
Bean cooking liquid (step 3}

Tomato puree
Onion, shopped
Sweet apple, unpared,

finely chopped
Prepared mustard
Worcestershire sauce
Sugar
Pepper

1-1/4 cups
4 cups
1/8 teaspoon
1

cup
2/3 cup
1/2 cup
1 medium
1 tablespoon
1-1/2 teaspoons

2 teaspoons
1/8 teaspoon
1. Add beans to boiling water. Boil
2 minutes. Remove from heat,
cover, and soak 1 hour or
overnight in refrigerator.
2. Add salt. Bring beans to a boil.
Reduce heat, cover, and boil
gently until tender—1 to 1-1/2
hours.
3. Drain. Save 1 cup bean
cooking liquid. Mix with beans
and remaining ingredients in
saucepan. Bring to aboil. Reduce
heat, cover, and boil gently 30
minutes.
4. Continue cooking, uncovererd,
until sauce is of desired
consistency—about 10 minutes.
5. Serve half of the beans and
refrigerate remaining 2 cups for
use at another meal within 3 to
4 days, t
*NOTE: 3-1/4 cups canned navy
beans, drained, may be used in
place of dried beans; omit 4 cups
boiling water and salt and steps 1
and 2. Use 1 cup water in place of
bean cooking liquid. Combine beans
and 1 cup water with other
ingredients and proceed as directed
in step 3 above. About 250 calories

per serving.
•f-NOTE: Reheat beans over medium
heat until mixture is bubbly,
stirring as needed to prevent sticking.

48

Sweet and Sour Meatballs
2 servings of 6 meatballs and about 3/4 cup rice each
465 calories per serving
Meatball mixture CP* 31)
Water
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper
Sugar

Vinegar
Worcestershire sauce

Green pepper, cut in 1-inch
pieces
Cornstarch
Water
Raisins
Bice, cooked, unsalted
1/2 recipe
3/4 cup
1/8 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon
dash
1 teaspoon
1 tablespoon
1-1/8 teaspoons
1/2 cup
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon
2 tablespoons
1-1/2 cups
1. Thaw frozen meatball mixture
in refrigerator.
2. Divide into 12 portions. Shape
into balls.
3. Brown meatballs on all sides in
hot frypan. Drain.
4. Add 3/4 cup water and
seasonings. Bring to aboil.
Reduce heat, cover, and simmer
10 minutes.
5. Add green pepper and continue
cooking for 1 minute.
6. Mix cornstarch and 1
tablespoon water until smooth.
Stir into meatball mixture. Stir
in raisins.
7. Cook, uncovered, until liquid is
clear and thickened, about 2
minutes. Stir occasionally to
prevent sticking.
8. Serve over rice.
49

Taco Salad
2 servings of about 2-1/3 cups each
408 calories per serving with bean cooking liquid

390 calories per serving with water
Regular ground beef
Onion, chopped
Flour
Dried kidney beans, cooked,

unsalted, drained*
Tomato puree
Bean cooking liquid or water
Chili powder
Oregano leaves

Salt
Garlic powder
Lettuce, torn in bite-size pieces

Tomato, cut in chunks
Green pepper, coarsely chopped
Cornmeal chips, crumbled (p. 62)

1/3 pound
3 tablespoons
1 teaspoon
1
cup
1/3 cup
£ tablespoons
1 teaspoon
1/4 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

1/8 teaspoon
% cups
1 small (about 4 ounces)
1/4 cup
8
1. Cook "beef and onion "until "beef is
well browned. Drain. Stir in
flour.
2. Stir in "beans, tomato puree,
"bean liquid or water, and
seasonings.
3. Cook over low heat until
thickened—about 10 minutes.
4. Mix lettuce, tomato chunks, and
green pepper.
5. To serve, place half of lettuce
mixture (about 1-1/2 cups) on
each plate. Mound half of "beef
mixture (about 3/4 cup) in
center of lettuce mixture.
Sprinkle crumbled cornmeal
chips over beef mixture. Serve
immediately.
*NOTE: 1 cup canned kidney beans,
drained, may be used in place of
cooked dried kidney beans; then

omit salt and use water instead of
bean liquid in step 2. About 365

calories per serving.
50

Turkey-Potato Salad
2 servings of about 1 cup each
230 calories per serving

Turkey, cooked, diced (from
Braised Turkey Drumsticks,
p. 37, step 6)
Celery, chopped
Potato, cooked, peeled, diced
Onion, chopped
Green pepper, chopped
Salad dressing, mayonnaise-type
Prepared mustard
Salt

3/4 cup
1/4 cup
1
cup
1 tablespoon
% tablespoons
2 tablespoons
1/4 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

1. Mix turkey, celery, potato,
onion, and green pepper.
2. Mix salad dressing, mustard,
and salt. Stir lightly into turkey
mixture.
3. Chill.
51

Turkey Spanish. Bice
2 servings of about 1 cup each
215 calories per serving

Onion, cut in pieces
Green pepper, chopped
Celery, sliced
Bice, uncooked

Margarine
Tomatoes
Turkey, cooked, diced (from
Braised Turkey Drumsticks,
p. 37, step 6)

Water
Chili powder
Salt

Pepper
Bay leaf
1/4 cup
1/4 cup
2 tablespoons
1/4 cup
1/2 teaspoon
half of a 16-ounce can
(about 1 cup}
8/3 cup
1/4 cup
1/4 teaspoon
1/16 teaspoon

dash
1
1. Cook vegetables and rice in
margarine in a small saucepan
until onion begins to brown-
about 4 minutes.
2. Break up large pieces of
tomatoes. Add tomatoes and
remaining ingredients to rice
mixture.
3. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat,
cover, and cook slowly until rice
is tender—about 25 minutes.
Stir as needed to prevent
sticking.
4. Remove bay leaf.

Bean-Vegetable Combo
2 servings of about 1 cup each
180 calories per serving with, bean liquid
165 calories per serving with water
Onion, chopped.
Carrot, diced
Bay leaf
Margarine
Cabbage, cut in 1-inch pieces

Salt
Pepper
Garlic powder
Dry pea (navy) beans, cooked,

unsalted, drained*
Bean cooking liquid or water
Green pepper, finely chopped
1/3 cup
1/8 cup

1
1 teaspoon
2 cups
1/4 teaspoon
dash
dash

1
cup
2 tablespoons
1 tablespoon
1. Stir-fry onion, carrot, and "bay
leaf in margarine in hot frypan
for 5 minutes.
2. Stir in cabbage. Sprinkle with,
seasonings. Cover and cook over
low heat until cabbage is tender
but crisp—about 5 minutes.
3. Add remaining ingredients. Heat
to serving temperature—about 5
minutes. Stir as needed to
prevent sticking.
4. Remove bay leaf.
*NOTE: 1 cup canned navy beans,
drained, may be used in place of
cooked dried beans; then omit salt

in step 2. About 19S calories per
serving with bean liquid; 180 with

water.
53

Celery Salad
2 servings of about 2/3 cup each
SO calories per serving

Celery, thinly sliced
Carrot, shredded

Onion, chopped
Salad dressing, mayonnaise-type

Prepared mustard
Vinegar
Pepper
1
cup
1/3 cup
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon
1/2 teaspoon

1 teaspoon
dash
1. Mix celery, carrot, and onion.
2. Mix remaining ingredients. Stir
into celery mixture.
3. Chill.
54

Hot Potato Salad
2 servings of about 1 cup each
235 calories per serving

Bacon slices
Onion, chopped
Flour
Sugar
Salt
Pepper

Water
Vinegar
Potato, cooked, peeled, sliced
1/4 pound
1/4 cup
1 tablespoon

2 teaspoons
1/8 teaspoon
dash
1/2 cup
3 tablespoons
1-2/3 cups (8/3 pound as
purchased—about % medium)
1. Cook "bacon in frypan until
crisp. Remove from pan and
drain on paper towel. Crumble
"bacon. Discard bacon fat.
2. Cook onion in frypan until
tender.
3. Mix flour, sugar, salt, and
pepper. Stir into onion.
4. Gradually stir in water and
vinegar. Cook, stirring
constantly, until thickened—
about 3 minutes.
5. Add potatoes and "bacon. Mix
gently. Heat to serving
temperature over low heat-
about 5 minutes.
55

Macaroni and Cheese Salad
2 servings ofl cup each
270 calories per serving
Elbow macaroni, cooked,
unsalted, drained (cooled to
room temperature)
Process American cheese, cut in
small pieces
Celery, sliced
Onion, chopped

Salad dressing, mayonnaise-type
Vinegar
Pepper
cups
1/S cup
1/3 cup

2 tablespoons
2 tablespoons
2 teaspoons

1/8 teaspoon
1. Mix macaroni, cheese, celery,
and onion.
2. Mix salad dressing, vinegar, and
pepper thoroughly. Stir into
macaroni mixture.
3. Chill.
56

Potato Salad
2 servings of about 3/4 cup each
160 calories per serving
Potatoes, cooked, peeled, diced
Celery, chopped
Onion, chopped
Salad dressing,

mayonnaise-type
Prepared mustard
Salt
Pepper

cups (8/3 pound as
purchased—about 8 medium)
3 tablespoons
1 tablespoon
8 tablespoons
1/8 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

dash
1. Mix potatoes, celery, and onion.
8. Mix salad dressing, mustard,
salt, and pepper. Stir lightly into
potato mixture.
3. Chill.

Pork and Cabbage Soup
2 servings of about 1-1/4 cups each
205 calories per serving

Defatted pork drippings (from
Roast Fork Shoulder, p. 45,
step 3)

Cooked pork, diced (from Roast
Pork Shoulder, step 4)
Cabbage, coarsely shredded
Boiling water
Celery, sliced
Green pepper, diced

Salt
Pepper
Bay leaf

about 1 tablespoon
1
cup
% cups
1-1/2 cups
1/3 cup
1/4 cup

1/4 teaspoon
dash
1
1. Heat pork drippings in
saucepan.
2. Add pork and brown lightly.
3. Add cabbage and stir-fry for 2
minutes.
4. Stir in water and remaining
ingredients. Return to a boil;
reduce heat, cover, and simmer
25 minutes.
5. Remove bay leaf.
58

Split Pea Soup
4 servings of about 1-1/3 cups each
330 calories per serving
Dried split peas
Onion, chopped
Carrot, shredded
Salt
Pepper

Oregano leaves
Bay leaf
Boiling water
1-3/4 cups
2/3 cup
2/3 cup

1/8 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

1
4-1/2 cups
1. Add all ingredients to boiling
water.
2. Return to a boil. Reduce heat,
cover, and boil gently until peas
are tender—about 40 minutes.
3. If necessary, uncover and cook,
stirring occasionally, until
desired thickness is obtained—
about 5 minutes.
4. Remove bay leaf.
5. Serve half of the soup.
Refrigerate remaining 2-2/3
cups for use at another meal.*
The soup will keep 3 to 4 days in
the refrigerator.
*NOTE: To reheat soup, stir in. 1/4
cup water. Heat until soup starts to
boil, stirring as needed to prevent

sticking.
59

RECIPES: SANDWICHES
Barbecue Beef Sandwich
8 sandwiches
405 calories per sandwich

Regular ground beef
Tomato puree
Onion, chopped
Vinegar
Sugar
Dry mustard
Pepper

Hamburger rolls
1/2 pound
1/3 cup
1/4 cup

2 tablespoons
Z teaspoons

1/4 teaspoon
dash
1. Cook "beef until lightly "browned.
Drain fat.
2. Mix in remaining ingredients
except hamburger rolls.
3. Cover and cook over low heat for
SO minutes to blend flavors. Stir
occasionally.
4. Spoon mixture onto bottom
halves of rolls (about 1/S cup
per sandwich). Cover with top
halves.
60

RECIPES: SANDWICHES
Cottage Cheese-Vegetable
Sandwich
2 sandwiches
195 calories per sandwich with white bread
180 calories per sandwich with whole-wheat bread

Lowf at cottage cheese
Carrot, shredded
Celery, chopped
Green pepper, chopped
Onion, very finely chopped

Pepper
Bread

1/2 cup
2 tablespoons
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon
1 teaspoon

dash
4 slices
1. Mix all ingredients except bread.
2. Spread one-half of mixture on
each of 2 bread slices. Top with
remaining bread.
61

Cornxneal Chips
30 chips
15 calories per chip
Water
Margarine
Chili powder
Garlic powder
Salt

Yellow cornmeal
1/2 cup
1-1/2 tablespoons
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon, as desired
1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon, as desired
1/8 teaspoon

8/3 cup
1. Preheat oven to 375°F
(moderate).
2. Lightly grease baking sheet.
3. Heat water, margarine, and
seasonings to boiling. Remove
from heat. Stir in cornmeal and
mix well.
4. Divide dough, into 30 portions
using about 1 teaspoon dough
each. Roll each portion into a
ball about 3/4 inch in diameter.
5. Place balls on baking sheet,
about 3 inches apart. Cover with
wax paper and press with
bottom of a glass until very thin,
about 2-1/2 inches in diameter.
Remove wax paper.
6. Bake until lightly browned and
crisp—about 15 minutes.
7. Cool on rack. Store in airtight
container.
62

Cornmeal Pancakes
6 pancakes
90 calories per pancake
Yellow cornmeal
Flour
Instant nonfat dry milk

Sugar
Baking powder
Salt

Water
Margarine, melted
1/3 cup
1/3 cup
2 tablespoons
2 teaspoons

1 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon

1 large
1/3 cup
1 tablespoon
1. Mix dry ingredients.
2. Mix egg and water thoroughly.
Stir into dry ingredients with
margarine. Mix until dry
ingredients are "barely
moistened. Batter will "be lumpy.
3. For each pancake, pour "batter
onto hot griddle or frypan, using
about 3 tablespoons "batter. Cook
until top is "bubbly and edges
begin to dry.
4. Turn and brown other side.
63

8 biscuits
95 calories per biscuit
Biscuit mix (p. 31)
Water
cups
1/3 cup
1. Preheat oven to 425°F(hot).
2. Lightly grease baking sheet.
3. Stir mix and water together.
Mix well.
4. Drop dough "by tablespoon onto
baking sheet to form 8 biscuits.
5. Bake until lightly browned—
about 12 minutes.
Muffins
(using biscuit mix)
8 muffins
135 calories per muffin
Biscuit mix (p. 31)
Sugar
Water
1-3/4 cups
2 tablespoons
1/3 cup
1 large
1. Preheat oven to 400°F(hot).
2. Lightly grease muffin tins.
3. Stir mix and sugar together.
4. Mix water and egg thoroughly;
add to mix and sugar. Stir until
dry ingredients are barely
moistened. Batter will be lumpy.
5. Fill muffin tins two-thirds full.
6. Bake until lightly browned—
about 20 minutes.
64

Apple Cobbler
(using biscuit mix)

4 servings of about 1/2 cup each
155 calories per serving
Cornstarcli
Sugar
Ground cinnamon

Water
Apples, tart, pared, sliced
Biscuit mix (p. 31)
Process American cheese,
shredded
Water
1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon
1/8 teaspoon

3/4 cup
2 medium
3/4 cup
2 tablespoons
3 tablespoons

1. Preheat oven to 400°F(hot).
2. Mix cornstarch, sugar, and
cinnamon in saucepan. Add 3/4
cup water and mix well. Add
apples.
3. Cook over low heat, stirring
occasionally, until liquid
thickens and apples just begin
to soften—about 6 minutes.
4. Pour into 1-quart casserole.
5. Stir biscuit mix and cheese
together. Add 3 tablespoons
water and mix well. Spread on
top of apple mixture.
6. Bake until top is lightly
browned—about 30 minutes.
65

Bread Pudding
4 servings of about 1/2 cup each
145 calories per serving using white bread
140 calories per serving using whole-wheat bread

Bread, cut in 1-inch pieces
Raisins
Sugar
Ground, cinnamon

Egg, slightly beaten
Vanilla
Reconstituted instant nonfat dry
milk
cups, about 2 slices
1/3 cup
2 tablespoons
3/4 teaspoon

1 large
1/4 teaspoon
1-1/4 cups
1. Place bread pieces in 1-quart
casserole. Sprinkle with raisins.
2. Mix sugar and cinnamon. Stir
into egg. Add vanilla.
3. Heat milk (do not "boil). Stir
warm milk into egg mixture
slowly.
4. Pour mixture over bread.
5. Bake at 325°F (slow oven) until
tip of knife inserted into center
comes out clean—about 40
minutes.
6. Serve warm or cold.
66

Carrot-Hals i
24 bars
60 calories per bar
Sugar
Margarine, softened
Egg
Vanilla
Water

Flour
Baking powder

Ground cinnamon
Salt
Quick-cooking rolled oats
Raisins, chopped
Carrot, shredded

1/3 cup
1/3 cup
1 large
1 teaspoon
1/4 cup
3/4 cup
1 teaspoon
3/4 teaspoon
1/4 teaspoon
1/2 cup
1/4 cup
1/2 cup

1. Preheat oven to 35O°F
(moderate).
2. Lightly grease 8-inch by 8-inch
bakingpan.
3. Beat sugar and margarine with
an electric mixer at medium
speed initU well blended—about
2 minutes. Add egg and vanilla.
Beat well. Mix in water.
4. Mix flour, baking powder,
cinnamon, and salt. Add to egg
mixture. Mix until blended.
5. Mix in oats, raisins, and carrot.
6. Spread dough in pan.
7. Bake until toothpick inserted
into center comes out clean-
about 35 minutes.
67

Chocolate Pudding
(using pudding mix)
2 servings of about 1/2 cup each
160 calories per serving
Padding mix (p. 32)
Cocoa
Sugar

Water
Margarine
Vanilla
1/2 cup
1-1/2 tablespoons
1/2 tablespoon

3/4 cup
1 teaspoon
1/2 teaspoon
1. Stir mix, cocoa, and sugar
together in saucepan. Add water
and mix well.
2. Cook over medium heat, stirring
constantly, until mixture just
"begins to boil—about 5 minutes.
Remove from heat.
3. Stir in margarine and vanilla.
4. Pour pudding into "bowl. Place
wax paper directly on surface of
pudding.
5. Chill.
68
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1985 495 565

Peanut Butter Snack Loaf
(using biscuit mix)
12 slices, about 1/2-inch thick each
175 calories per slice

Smooth peanut butter
Sugar
Egg

Water
Vanilla

Biscuit mix (p. 31)
cup
1/2 cup
1 large
1/2 cup
1 teaspoon
1-3/4 cups

1. Preheat oven to 350°F
(moderate).
2. Lightly grease 8-inch by 4-inch
loaf pan.
3. Beat peanut "butter and sugar
with, an electric mixer at
medium speed until well
blended—about 2 minutes.
4. Mix egg, water, and vanilla
thoroughly. Stir into peanut
butter mixture.
5. Add biscuit mix and beat just
until smooth.
6. Pour into pan.
7. Bake until toothpick inserted
into center of loaf comes out
clean—about 40 minutes.
69