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Vegetables in Family Meals, A Guide for Consumers
1975
--
Consumer and Food Economics Institute
Agricultural Research Service
Home and Garden Bulletin 105, USDA, 1965.
Slightly revised January 1975

Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations.

The PDF file was provided courtesy of the National Agricultural Library.

Scroll down to view the publication.
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Buying vegetables ...................... . .
Purchase units ....- ..................
Number of servings ............. _.
Storing vegetables — ...... _.. ....... -
Fresh ............. _ _ _ ...... _ - _ ....... __ ........ _ . ............... -
Frozen _ „ ........ _ _ ..... . _ . ........ __________ ............... -
Canned and dried _ .................... _ .....
Cooking fresh vegetables ....
Preparing ______________ . _______ ...... - ._ - ....... - - .......
Boiling ........ __________________________ ....... _ ............ ...
Pressure cooking _.. ........
Baking- ......... - ..... .__ ........... — _ ...............................
F re n eh f tying - .............................. _________
F r,y ing
_________________ ............
-
........
-
...........
-
..........
. -
Pa n rung" ......... - - ......... ___ ........... - ....... ~ -
Oieamiijcr and scalloping
Glazing: .......... — .................... - ....... - ......... - .............
Cooking frozen vegetables _
Baking
Page
1
21
3
3
3
5
5
8
6
6
6
8
9
1 0
1 1
11
12
12
12
18
Heating
1
canned vegetables - . .
Cooking dried vegetables -
Dehydrated "vegetables _ __
Dry beans and whole peas
Lentils _ __
Split peas -
Seasonings and sauces
Spices and "herbs ...
Sauces in variety _
Lively leftovers
Recipes ......... - ......... . ............ ._ ...................... ___ ....... _ _ . ......
Vegetable dishes ..... - ....... _ ..... ________
Luncheon or supper main
dishes — .................... _________________________
Soups and chowders ..... .__ ........
Salads - ...................... _ .............. —
Page
14
14
15
15
18
16
16
19
19
19

23
26
28
Index to- recipes _________________ ............. __________ 32
'Prepared by
Consumer and Food Economics Institute
Agricultural Research Service
Washington, D.I:
Sliphtlv revised January 1975
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VEGETABLES IN FAMILY MEALS:
Vegetables grow in great va-
riety—from A (asparagus) to Z
(zucchini)* Often they are low in
cost and calories and a number of
them rank high in vitamins and
minerals. One-half cup of most
boiled vegetables contains less
than 50 calories. Starchy vege-
tables like lima beans, peas, corn,
an.d plain, boiled potatoes supply
from 50 to 100 calories in a half-
cop serving".
Most dark-green and deep-
yellow vegetables excel as depend-
able 'and inexpensive sources of
vitamin A. In fact,' unless your
meals include several servings of
carrots, spinach, sweetpotatoes,
winter squash, broccoli, kale or
other greens each week, your
family may not get enough vita-
min A, As a bonus, many dark-
green vegetables supply valuable
amounts of vitamin C, Iron, and
other vitamins and minerals.
The mature dry legumes—dry
peas and members of the bean
family including navy, pinto, and
soybeans—are outstanding among
the vegetables for the protein
Guide for Consumers
they contain. They also contrib-
ute B vitamins, iron, and other
nutrients.
And how drab our diets would
be without the color and crispness
of fresh-tossed salads, the tang
and texture of relishes, and the
distinctive flavors of our vege-
table dishes.
Raw vegetables are becoming"
increasingly popular as a low-cal-
orie between-meal snack. Weight
watchers do well to keep a supply
of celery sticks, carrot sticks,
radishes, or green pepper slices
ready in the refrigerator to eat
when, hunger strikes.
In this publication you'll find—-
* Practical tips on buying and
storing vegetables.
« Basic, easy-to-f ollow methods
of coo-king" vegetables,
* Numerous ways to enhance
the natural flavor of vegetables
with spices, herbs, and sauces.,
* Suggestions for using left-
over vegetables.
« Recipes that make the most
of vegetables in feeding the fam-
ily well
BUYING VEGETABLES
Besides a variety of fresh vege-
tables now available the year
round,, you usually have the choice
of buying other forms—canned,
frozen, or dehydrated.
Here are points you may want
to consider in making your choice:
* Fresh Vegetables are gener-
ally highest in quality and lowest
in price when in semon. In select-
ing, look first for frt^
tables should V riiyjpai\\itr'i 1*
dry; exceF,si\\e mo'slmr h a s t : K •
decay.
• Canned vegetables are prob-
ably the most convenient because
they need only brief reheating
and do not require refrigerated
storage until the can Is opened.
• Frozen vegetables closely re-
semble fresh vegetables in color,
flavor, and, texture, and usually
cost more than canned vegetables,
• Dehydrated vegetables usu-
ally take up less storage room
than fresh, canned, OT frozen
vegetables. Some dehydrated vege-
tables cost slightly more than
comparable fresh products,, but
can be prepared much more
quickly,
• Dry legumes—including dry-
beans, peas, and lentils—are in-
expensive but take a relatively
long time to prepare,
For further help on buying veg-
etables in their different forms,
see HG 143, "How To Boy Fresh
Vegetables;'
1
PA 70S, "How To
Use USDA Grades in Buying
Food;" HG 167, "How To Boy
Canned and Frozen Vegetables;'
1
*
l
Purchase Units
Canned vegetables come in a
variety of can sizes. The most pop-
ular family size is one that holds
16 ounces. If you have a one- or
two-person family, the 8-or SVk-
ounce can Is a good choice. Can
sizes most commonly available
amount of
.
1
Available from U.S. Department of
Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20260,
Include your ZIP Code.
amount of
Can size contents
8 or 8^ ounces ... ......... ....... _ _ 1 cup
12 ounces ____________________________ 1% cups
1 6 ounces _ _ ............ _ ........ _ - ....... . ..... _ - ..... 2 cups
27" to 29 ounces __ ..... __ ..... ...... - 3% cups
104 to 11,7 ounces
(6% pounds to 7
pounds 5 ounces) ________________ 12 to. 13 cups
Most frozen vegetables come in
the familiar "family-size" 10-
ounce package,,, A few come in 8-»
9-, and 12-ounce packages. Many
retail markets also offer 16- and
32-ounce packages of some vege-
tables.
Some frozen vegetables are sold
In heavy polyethylene bags. You
can get 16, 24
?
and 32 ounces of
cut green beans,, corn, peas, peas
and carrots, potatoes, and mixed
vegetables packaged this way,
The advantage of this type of
packaging is that the vegetables
are usually separate enough to
pour from the bag, making It pos ......
sible to use part of the package
and return the rest to the freezer.
For good-quality frozen vege-
tables, follow these suggestions:
* Select clean, firm packages.
If packages are soft, you can be
sure the food lias already lost
quality. However, a hard-frozen
package does not assure high
quality, Frozen food is safe to
eat as long as the package remains
frozen, but a storage temperature
of 0° P. or lower is necessary to
maintain high quality,
• Buy only frozen foods that
are displayed in a properly refrig-
erated cabinet made for that pur-
pose, Do not .buy frozen vegeta-
bles stacked outside the frozen
food cabinet even If they axe
packed in dry ice,
* Select packages only from
clean, cabinets in which foods, are
stacked no higher than the proper
fill line, This line, which is marked
on the inner side of many cabi-
nets, indicates the level above
which frozen foods should not be
stacked.
* Look for a thermometer in
the cabinet; If there is one, it
should register 0'° F. or below,,
* Flan to pick up frozen foods
last when shopping. For the trip
home, it's a good idea to protect
frozen foods in an insulated bag
or a double paper bag, particu-
larly in warm weather. At home,
get packages into home freezer
or freezing compartment as
quickly as possible,
Number of Servings
The number of servings you get
from a common-size purchase unit
oi
?
a vegetable varies widely with
the kind of vegetable and whether
it is fresh, frozen, canned, or
dried.
Necessarily, the Inedible parts
of fresh vegetables—pods, husks,,
paring's, and trimmings—-lower
the yield .of edible food per pound.
Some fresh vegetables shrink be-
cause they lose water during
cooking; others absorb water and
swell as they cook.
Yield from a pound of fresh
vegetables may vary from two to
six servings (*/£ cup each) of
cooked food. For the approximate
amount of each vegetable to buy
for six servings, see the Boiling
Guide for Fresh Vegetables, page
7,
Frozen vegetables usually do
not lose much weight or volume
during preparation. For the ap-
proximate amount of each vege-
table to buy for six servings, see
the Boiling Guide for Home Frozen
Vegetables, page 13.
Some loss of volume occurs dur-
ing' preparation of canned vege-
tables for serving if the liquid is
drained from the vegetables or If
the liquid is concentrated during
cooking. From a 16-ounce can of
most vegetables you can expect
three or four servings (*4 cup
each) of drained vegetables and
two or three servings of canned
greens, such as kale or spinach,
Dried -vegetables increase con-
siderably in weight and volume
during cooking because they ab-
sorb water, See the Boiling Guide
for Dry Beans, Peas, and Lentils,
page 15, for the approximate yield
of cooked food from a cup of dry
beans, peas, or lentils,
Fresh
Evert under Ideal storage con-
ditions—the right
temperature
and. humidity—most
fresh vege-
tables retain top quality only for
a few days.
3
Green, leafy vegetables quickly
wilt and change flavor as water
evaporates from tissues. Other
vegetables—corn, beans, and peas
—lose sweetness within _ a short
time as sugar converts to starch.
Most fresh green vegetables
keep well and stay crisp if put in
covered containers or plastic bags
and stored in the refrigerator. If
you wash lettuce, celery,, and other
leafy vegetables before storing,
drain thoroughly because too
much moisture can hasten decay.
Tops should be removed from
beets, carrots, and radishes.
Always sort vegetables before
storing. Discard or use at once
any bruised or soft vegetables;
do not store them with sound,
firm vegetables.
To maintain high quality in the
following .fresh vegetables, store
them in
a
the.,
refrigerator in the
crisper or in plastic bags, and use
within the time specIIecL
^£SSZ3^^rr2 °
r
3 days.
"Beam, snap (green or "wax)—
1 week,,
Beets—2 weeks,
Broccoli, brussels sprouts—3 to
5 days.
Cabbage—1 or 2 weeks*
C^lfj?!?—2 weeks.
Cauliflower—1 week.
Celery—1 week.
Cucumbers—1 week.
Greens—spinach, kale, collards,
chard, beet, turnip, and mustard
greens—$ to 5 clays.
Jjgttuce and other salad greens
—1 week,
Mushrooms—1 or 2 days,
"Okrctr—B to 5 days.""""
Onions, green—& to 5 days.
Parsnips—2 weeks,
Radishes » I
Squash, sum met—
3 to 5 days.
Here are specific directions for
storing other vegetables and the
length of time
llwy can usually
be held.:
Beans, lima Store uncovered
in pods in refiip^rator—3 to 5
days.
Corn. Store unhusked and un-
covered in refrigerator—1 or 2
days,
Eggplant, Store at cool room
temperature (approximately 60°
F.). If air is dry, keep eggplant
in plastic bag to retain moisture
—1 or 3 clays,
Onions, mature. Store at room
temperature or slightly cooler
(60° F. is best). Put in loosely
woven or open-meshed containers
with good, circulation of air.
Onions'sprout or decay if temper-
ature or humidity is high, but will
keep several months in a cool,
dry place.
Peas, green. Store uncovered
in pods In refrigerator—3 to 5
days.
Potatoes. Store in a dark, dry-
place with good ventilation and a
temperature of 45° to 50° F,, May
be held several months under
these conditions.
Squash. Store hard-rind winter
varieties, in cool, dry place (about
60° F,), Keeps several months,
Sweetpot&toes, rutabagas. Store
at cool room temperature (about
60 ° F.). Temperatures below
50° may cause chilling injury.
Stored- this way, these vegetables
keep several months.
NOTE : Mature onions, potatoes,
winter squash, sweetpotatoes, and
rutabagas can be kept at room
temperature for a short time If it
is not possible to store them at
the temperatures recommended.
Buy only enough for a week,
Tomatoes. Store ripe tomatoes
uncovered in the refrigerator.
Keep unripe tomatoes at room
temperature away from direct
sunlight until ripe, then refriger-
ate. Too much sunlight prevents
development of even color,
Frozen
Frozen vegetables should be
stored at 0° F. or lower. Stored
at 0°
?
they retain quality and nu-
tritive value several months.
Most home freezers and freezer
sections of refrigerator-freezer
combinations can maintain a tem-
perature near 0° F., but freezing
compartments of most conven-
tional home refrigerators cannot.
Before buying' large quantities of
frozen vegetables, check the tem-
perature of your frozen food stor-
age area, If the temperature is
above 0°, plan to use frozen vege-
tables within a few clays.
Exactly how long commercially
frozen vegetables will retain high
quality when stored at 0° F. de-
pends on the kind of vegetable
and condition at time of purchase-
Maximum storage' suggested for
commercially frozen . asparagus,
beans, cauliflower, corn, peas, and
spinach is. 8 months,, Home-frozen
vegetables should maintain high
quality 8 to 12 months.
For further Information on
storing- frozen vegetables, see
HG 69, "Home Care of Purchased
Frozen Food,"
2
and HG 10,
"Home Freezing of Fruits and
Vegetables."
2
Dried
Store unopened canned vege-
tables in a cool, dry place,, For
best quality, use canned vegeta-
bles within a year of purchase.
Vegetables lose quality if stored
too long, -but remain Indefinitely
safe to eat If the seal is not
broken.
Freezing does not make canned
vegetables unsafe to eat unless it
breaks the seal and lets in bac-
teria that cause spoilage. Rust
on the can caused by dampness.
is not harmful to the food unless
it penetrates the can.
Food may be left in tin cans
after opening. Put a cover on the
can and store In refrigerator,.
Some vegetables, particularly acid
vegetables like tomatoes,, develop
an unpleasant, but harmless,
metallic taste from a chemical
reaction of the food to the can
lining after opening. Use canned
vegetables within 2 or 3 days
after opening,
Store dried vegetables in tightly
closed containers in a cool, dry
place. Most dried vegetables will
keep several months.
* Available from U.S. Department of
Agriculture, Washington, B.C. 20250.
Include your ZIP Code.
COOKING FRESH VEGETABLES
Preparing
Remove bruised, wilted, yel-
lowed, or tough portions from
fresh vegetables. Trim sparingly
to avoid excessive loss of food and
nutrients. If root vegetables and
potatoes are pared before cook-
ing, make parings thin.
Dark-green outer leaves of cab-
bage, lettuce, and other leafy
green vegetables contain valuable
nutrients, so don't discard them
unless they are wilted or tough.
Remove woody midribs from kale
leaves—there is little loss of nu-
tritive value and the kale tastes
better,
Wash vegetables thoroughly be-
fore cooking, Use plenty of water
for leafy greens; lift them from
water to let sand and grit settle.
Soak fresh brussels sprouts and
broccoli in cold salt water for a
short time to remove Insects if
any are present, Cover potatoes
with water to prevent darkening
If held after paring. Long soaking
of most vegetables, however, Is
not desirable because* some nu-
trients dissolve in the water.
Boiling
To insure the best flavor, color,
texture, and food value in vege-
tables, cook them only until they
are tender. Vegetables cooked
whole in skins retain most of their
nutritive value. To shorten cook-
Ing* time—cut, slice, dice, or
coarsely shred vegetables.
The amount of water used in
cooking is important—the less
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Here are directions for boiling
fresh vegetables:
», Bring salted water to a boil
(use i/* to 1 teaspoon salt for six
servings of vegetable),
• Add vegetable. Cover and
quickly bring* water-back to a
boil.
• Reduce heat and cook gently
until vegetable is just tender.
(See boiling guide, p. 7.)
• Serve immediately; flavor
and nutritive value may be lost
if vegetables are allowed to stand.
Pressure Cooking
In cooking vegetables, follow
the directions that came with
your cooker, but learn to adjust
cooking* time to suit the quality
of vegetable being cooked. Very
young, tender vegetables may re-
quire a shorter cooking time than
is recommended. Even 1 or 2 min-
utes extra cooking can cause un-
desirable color, changes in tex-
ture, and loss of nutrients.
Here are directions for pres-
sure cooking:
Boiling Guide for Fresh Vegetables
Vegetable
Cooking time after water
returns to boil
Minutes
Approximate amount
as purchased for
six servings)
(about '2 cup e a c h )
Pounds
Asparagus ._. - — 10 to 13 (whole) 2^
Beans, lima 25 to 27 _ 2% in pods
Beans, snap (green or wax)_ 13 to 15 (1-ineh pieces) - _ 1
Beets ._ 38 to 41 (whole) 2Vfe with tops or
1 % without tops
Broccoli - - - 9 to 12 (heavy stalk, split). 2
Cabbat f* - - _ 6 to S (shredded) _ 1 M
10 to 13 (wedges) _. _ _ _ _ 1!,
C n T 3 f » t r - _ 20 to 22 (whole) - )
,
irn
. ,,. ,„ , ,. ,, ,. ,,, P « v u t r c o f t Lov*
18 to 20 (sliced or diced) \\
C a u l U U ' V ' c r 8 to 12 (separated) .. _ j
20 to 24 (whole) ^ '
Cclrry ._ — 15 to 19 (cut-up) _ _
(
*
4
Co'^uf
1
? _ ,_ „- 15 to 20 _ _ _ i / u n t i l
Corn ._ 5 to 7 (on cob) „ _ )
6 to 8 (whole kernel) ___ ; '
w m
"
fa
Kale 15 to 20 _ ___ ' 1^ ait-nan
Okra __ ___ 12 to 14 1
1
1
Onions, mature 11 to 15 (whole) _. ) ,
3
,
10 to 14 (quartered) _ . . . ]
i / 4
Parsnips— 20 to 40 (whole) |
- v
8 to 15 (quartered.) ]
2
Peas - 10 to 14 _ 3 in pods
Potatoes _ 25 to 29 (whole, medium).
15 to 17 (quartered) ._
Spinach - _ _ .._ - 8 to 12 _ . _ _ ._ IVz prepackaged
Squash, acorn 18 to 20 (quartered)
Squash, butternut _ 16 to 18 (cubed) ._ __
Squash, yellow crookneck - 11 to 13 (sliced) _ ) ^
Squash, zucchini __ __ 13 to 15 (sliced) ___ _ _ j
1%
Sweetpotatoes 28 to 35 (whole) ._ 2
Tomatoes 7 to 15 (cut-up) ._ r
j
i
Turnips _ _ _ _ _ _ . _ 30 to 38 (whole) __ _ )
10 to 12 (cut-up) - I
l%
without tops
* Bring' pressure up quickly.
* Time the cooking period ex-
actly.
* Reduce pressure as quickly as
possible when time Is up.
» Season vegetables in the same
ways as plain boiled vegetables
(see variations, above, and sug-
gestions for use of herbs on p.
16).
Baking
Potatoes or sweetpotatoes
Preheat oven to 425° F. (hot).
Wash and dry vegetables. Rub
with a little fat to soften skin.
Prick with a fork to allow steam
to escape during baking" and to
p re vent bu rsti ng.
Bake until tender—for medium-
size potatoes, 50 to 60 minutes;
for sweetpotatoes, 35 to 60 min-
utes,
If other foods are to be cooked
at 350° or 875° F, (moderate),
potatoes or sweetpotatoes may be
baked along with them. Allow 10
to 20 minutes longer than times
given above.
VARIATIONS
Remove baked potato from skin
?
.mash with better or margarine
and milk, stuff back into skin, and
sprinkle with grated cheese or
spread with sour cream and
chopped chives. Return to oven
for 10 minutes or until lightly
browned,,
Scoop baked sweetpotato from
the skin; mash, with butter or mar-
garine and milk. Or use 1 table-
spoon peanut butter for each
sweetpotato in place of better or
margarine, or orange juice and
a little grated orange rind in place
of the milk. Stuff sweetpotato
mixture back into skins and re-
turn to oven for 10 minutes.
Carrots
Preheat oven to 375° F. (mod-
erate) .
Grease l^fa-qwirt casserole.
Wash and scrape medium-size
carrots; cut in half lengthwise.
TRY THESE VARIATIONS
Add a pinch of herbs (see p. 16)
or a tablespoon of minced onion,
green pepper, or chives before
cooking fresh vegetables. These
add flavor, without calories,
Season after cooking with a
flavorful fat—bacon drippings,
butter, or margarine—or with
salad oil to which a little lemon
juice, horseradish, or garlic has
been added.
Sprinkle lemon, juice or herb
vinegar on boiled vegetables for
pleasantly tart touch.
Mash vegetables, beat in a little
hot milk, add butter or margarine,
arid season with salt and pepper.
Serve with a tasty sauce (see
p.
16).
Place in casserole, (For six serv-
ings, use about 1.1/1 pounds me-
dium-size carrots.)
Add
J
/4 cup hot water,, Dot with
2 to 3 tablespoons butter or mar-
garine. Sprinkle with salt and
pepper. Cover,
Bake until tender, about 45
minutes,
Onions
Preheat &ven to §75° F
t
(mod-
erate) .
Grease iy%-qwLrt casserole,
Peel onions; cut in half cross-
wise.
Arrange with cut side up in
casserole. (For six servings, use 2
pounds of medium-size onions,)
Add just enough water to cover
bottom of casserole. Sprinkle with
salt and pepper. Cover,
S
Bake 30 minutes. Top with 1
cup buttered bread cubes and bake
uncovered 15 to 20 minutes longer
until cubes axe brown and onions
are tender.
Tomatoes
Preheat oven to 375° F. (mod-
erate) .
Wash tomatoes and cut off stem
ends. (Use one medium-size to-
mato for each serving.)
Place tomatoes in a casserole,
Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
Top with buttered bread cubes (1
cup .for six tomatoes). Add just
enough water to cover bottom of
casserole. Cover. Bake 15 minutes.
Uncover and bake 10 to 15 min-
utes longer until tomatoes are
soft and bread cubes are browned.
VARIATIONS
Top tomatoes with onion slices
and crisscross with green pepper
strips before baking. Omit but-
tered bread cubes.
Winter squash
Preheat oven to 400° P. (hoi).
Cut acorn squash in half or
Hubbard squash into 3- or 4-inch
cubes. (For six servings use three
acorn squash, or 3* pounds Hub-
bard squash.) Arrange in a bak-
ing
pan.
Brush squash with melted but-
ter or margarine and sprinkle
with salt and, brown sugar. Add
just enough water to cover bot-
tom of baking- pan. Cover the pan.
Bake acorn squash 30' minutes,
uncover; bake Hubbard squash
45 minutes, uncover. Continue
baking until squash is tender—
20 to 30 minutes for acorn, about
30 minutes for Hubbard*
VARIATION
Sprinkle a little cinnamon or
nutmeg on squash before baking.
Summer scjoosli
Preheat oven to 400° P, (hot).
Slice squash into i/^-ifteh slices.
(Use 3 pounds squash for six
servings.) Place squash in a cas-
serole. Dot with butter or mar-
garine, sprinkle with salt and 1
tablespoon finely chopped onion.
Add just enough water to cover
bottom of casserole. Cover.,
Bake 50 minutes'to 1 hour until
squash is tender.
French Frying
Vegetables that can be french
fried successfully include: pota-
toes; sweetpolaioes;
"breaded
green pepper rings; and batter-
dipped eggplant sticks; parsnips,
and onion ring's. Before frying'
potatoes or sweetpotatoes, rinse
them quickly in cold water to re-
move surface starch. Dry thor-
oughly,,
Do not overload the fry basket
when french frying. If too much
food is put into the basket at one '
time, the temperature of the fat
drops excessively, cooking slows
down, and the vegetable absorbs
more fat.
N
One-stage method:
» Fill
v
kettle one-third full of
fat or oil and heat to 370° to
385° F. Have fry basket in fat.
• Raise basket and add enough
vegetable to cover bottom of bas-
ket,,
• Lower basket gently Into fat.
If fat bubbles much, lift^nd lower
basket several times until bub-
bling
1
subsides.
• Fry until vegetable is cooked
through and golden brown.
• Lift basket from fat. Drain
a few seconds; then pour vegeta-
ble onto absorbent paper.
• Season. Spread, fried vege
table on a cookie sheet and place
in a warm oven to keep warm
while frying additional vegeta-
bles.
Two-stage method :
You may prefer the two-stage
_ method if you want to partially
prepare french fried potatoes and
sweetpotatoes ahead of time.
First stage—Proceed as for
one-stage method except fry only
until food is cooked, but not
brown. Do not hold parfries
longer than. 1 or 2 hours.at room
temperature or 24 hours in cov-
ered container in refrigerator. To
hold parfries longer than 24
hours, fieeze them
Second stage—
» Heat fat to 375" F, with fry
basket in fat,
• Raise basket and add about
two layers of parfries. *
• Fry until golden brown,
• Lift basket from fat. Drain
for a few seconds; then pour veg-
etable onto absorbent paper,
•' Season and serve.
Frying
Fried cooked vegetables
Parsnips, potatoes, sweetpota-
toes.—Use about 3 cups sliced or
diced cooked vegetable for six
servings (V£ cup each).
Heat 2 or 3 tablespoons butter,
maiyarine, or drippings in a
huivy f rypan over moderate heat,
Add vegetable and cook 5 to
10 minutes, or until lightly
browned. Turn vegetable during
cooking" to insure even browning.
Add a little diced onion, crum-
bled bacon,, or diced ham for va-
riety.
Fried raw vegetables
Carrots, onions, or potatoes.—
Use 3 cups sliced, raw vegetable
to make six servings (14 cup
each) of potatoes or carrots, or
six servings (*4 cup 'each) of
onions.
Heat 3 tablespoons fat or oil
in a heavy f rypan o\\ er moderate
heat.
Add sliced vegetable and cook
15 to 25 minutes, or until vegeta-
ble is tender and lightly browned.
Turn vegetable frequently*
Eggplant or tomatoes, - Use
one medium eggplant or four
medium-size, firm tomatoes for
six servings,,
Pare eggplant, Cut eggplant or
tomatoes Into \\ g-inch slices,
Dip vegetable slices into flour
or fine dry breadcrumbs.
Heat ^4 cup fat or oil in a heavy
frypan over moderate heat.
Add vegetable and cook over
low heat 2 to 4 minutes, or until
tender and lightly browned. Add
more fat or oil if necessary dur-
ing cooking to prevent sticking.
10
Panning
Panning—cooking shredded or
sliced vegetables in a small
amount of fat and water on top
of the range—is a good way to
prepare snap beans, cab bage,
carrots, corn, spinach, and sum-
mer squash. See cooking guide
below for length of time to cook
and amounts of vegetable and
other ingredients needed for six
servings (Vs cup each),
Directions for panning
1
;
• Shred or slice vegetable.
• Heat fat (butter, margarine,
or drippings) in heavy fry pan
over moderate heat.
• .Acid vegetable and sprinkle
with salt.
• Add/ water and cover pan to
hold in steam.
• Cook over low heat until veg-
etable is tender; stir occasionally
to prevent sticking.
VARIATIONS
Add. finely chopped onion or
onion juice before cooking. Or
add bits of crumbled crisp bacon
or diced ham to cooked vegetable.
Creaming and Scalloping
Start with any cooked vegetable
or combination of two or more
vegetables that go well together.
Besides the popular peas-and-car-
rots team, you can combine: Cauli-
flower and pea®, green beans and
corn, lima beans and carrots, as-

paragus and celery, carrots and
onions, and brussels sprouts and
celery,
Creamed
vegetables
6* servings, y% cup each
Add 3 cups cooked, drained
vegetables to 1 cup hot white
sauce (p. 16) ; heat to serving
temperature.
Scalloped vegetables
6 servings, i/2
C
^P wch
Preheat oven to $50° F. (mod-
erate) .
Grease 1-quart casserole.
Combine 3 cups cooked, drained
Guide for Cooking Panned Vegetables
6 servings (y% cup each)
Amount of—
Vegetable
Vegetable Fat Salt
Water
Quarts
Beans, snap (green or
wax), sliced in 1-Inch
pieces . _ _ — _ _ 1
Cabbage, finely shredded- 1
Carrots, thinly sliced 1
Corn, cut .__. . 1
Spinach, finely shredded-- 3
Summer squash, thinly
sliced 1
Table- Tea-
spoons spoons
1%
2
1%
2
Cooking
time
% cup
3 tablespoons
3 tablespoons
% cup
Minutes
20
to
25.
6
to 8.
10.
15 to 18.
6
to 3.
3 tablespoons 12 to 15.
11
vegetables and l
1
/^ cops medium
white sauce (standard or low-fat
recipe, p. 18) in casserole,
Top with 3 tablespoons fine dry
breadcrumbs (mixed with 2 tea-
spoons melted butter or marga-
rine).
Bake 25 to 30 minutes.
For a special touch of flavor in
scalloped vegetables, try one of
the following:
• Add a pinch of an herb—-
marjoram,, thyme, or oregano to
white sauce before combining
with vegetables.
• Alternate layers of vegetables
and sauce,
• Sprinkle between layers with
grated cheese, finely chopped
onion or parsley, or cooked mush-
rooms.
« Use crushed ready-to-eat ce-
real in place of breadcrumbs on
top.
Glazing
lot* i>n> ^ '/< » tni l ''"- 1 f -
are delicious \\ \\ i i c n
glazed. To prepare, cut the cooked
vegetable into strips or large
pieces. For six servings (1/2 cup
each) you'll need about 8 cups
cut cooked vegetable,,
Blend 2 tablespoons butter or
margarine with -V4 cup packed
brown sugar and 1 tablespoon
water in a heavy frypan over low
heat,
Add 3 cups cooked vegetable.
Cook over low heat, turning
vegetables several times until
sirup is very thick and vegetables
are well coated—takes from 5 to
10 minutes. Keep heat low to pre-
vent scorching,
VARIATIONS
Substitute frozen orange juice
concentrate for water. Or use
honey or maple sirup instead of
brown sugar and omit water.
COOKING FROZEN VEGETABLES
Frozen vegetables may be pre-
pared by boiling in a small
amount of water, or you can cook
them in a moderate oven while
you are baking other foods.
Cooked frozen vegetables are
seasoned and served like fresh
vegetables. If you like, you can
cream or scallop them or add them
to souffles, soups, or salads.
. - Boiling
Thawing before cooking is not
necessary for most frozen vege-
tables. Leafy vegetables, how-
ever, cook more evenly if thawed
just enough to separate the leaves
before you put them in boiling
water. It is a good idea to par-
tially thaw corn on the cob before
cooking it so that the' cob will be
heated through by the time the
corn is cooked.
Cook home-frozen vegetables as
follows:
• Bring lightly salted water to
a boil in a covered saucepan. The
amount of water varies with kind
of vegetable and size of package.
For most vegetables, */£ cup of
water is enough for a pint pack-
12
Boiling Guide for Home Frozen Vegetables
Vegetable
A spa r agu s ,
who!
e
Beans, lima
Beans, snap (green or wax), cut
Broccoli spears
Brussels sprouts
Carrots :
Slices .
Strips
Cauliflower _ _ _ _..
Corn :
Whole kerne! „_
On cob . .
Kale . _ _ .
Okra, whole
Peas
Spinach
Squash, summer, sliced
Cooking time after
water returns to boil
Minutes
8
to 10'
12 to 14
.. ? to 9
6
to 8
10 to 12
. . 6
to 8
7
to 9
2
to 6
- 7
to 9
4
to 8
— 8
to 10
6
to 8
8
to 10
2
to 6
6
to 8
Approximate
amount of
frozen vege-
table for
six servings
(
l
/2 cup each)
Qunees
24
13
16
22
20
18
18
20
20
82
25
18
18
25
22
Use enough water to cover
for corn-on-the-cob.
• Put frozen vegetable Into
boiling water, cover pan, and
bring quickly back to a boil. To
insure uniform cooking, it may
be- necessary to separate pieces
with a fork.
• When water returns to boil-
ing, reduce heat and start to count
time (see boiling guide above).
To cook commercially frozen
'vegetables, follow package direc-
tions.
Baking
Partially defrost vegetables to
separate the pieces. Spread vege-
tables in a greased casserole, add.
seasonings as desired, and cover.
Bake until just tender.
At 350° F. (moderate oven)
most vegetables require approxi-
mately 45 minutes. Cooking time
varies with the size of pieces and
how much they were thawed be-
fore baking.
HEATING CANNED VEGETABLES
Commercially canned vegeta-
bles need reheating only. Cook
gently just until heated through.
Since some vitamins and minerals
13
are in the cooking liquid, serve
the cooking* liquid with the vege-
table whenever practicable, or use
It in sauces, soups,, or gravies.
Heat home-canned vegetables
the same way If you are sure they
have been processed correctly • at
the recommended temperature,, If
you. are not absolutely sure, bring
vegetables to a rolling boil in the
liquid, then: cover and boll for at
least 10 minutes. Boil spinach and
corn 20 minutes.
Do not use
canned vegetables
that show any sign of spoilage—
bulging can ends, leakage, spurt-
ing liquid, off-odor, or mold. Do'
not even taste them. Destroy out
of

reach of children and pets.
COOKING DRIED VEGETABLES
Dehydrated Vegetables
Some of the newer dried vege-
table products are quickly and
easily prepared. Dehydrated po-
tato products, for example, take
less time than comparable prod-
ucts made from fresh potatoes.
Dehydrated onions may be recon-
stituted with water, or added
without reconstitution to -foods
high In liquid.
For best results with any quick-
cooking vegetable product, follow
package directions carefully.
Dry Beans and Whole Peas
Soaking,—Dry beans and whole
peas require soaking before cook-
ing, Use the amount of water rec-
ommended for the vegetable in
the boiling guide, on page 15.
Boil beans and peas 2 minutes,
remove from heat, soak. 1 hour,
and then cook. Or soak overnight
after the 2-minute boil, and then
cook,
Long cooking times for beans
can be shortened by adding small
amounts of baking soda to water
at beginning of soaking periods.
If tap water is of medium hard-
ness, add, % teaspoon soda to the
water for each cup of dry beans
to reduce cooking time about one-
fourth, Measure soda exactly:; ex-
cessive soda affects flavor and
nutritive value of beans,
Boiling.—Cook in soaking wa-
ter; add 1 teaspoon salt for each
cup of the dry vegetable,
To reduce foaming during cook-
ing, add 1 tablespoon meat drip-
pings or other fat for. each cup
of dry beans or whole peas.
Boil gently, uncovered, for a
few minutes until foaming has
decreased. Then cover and boil
gently until tender. See boiling
guide (p. 15) for approximate
boiling time.

Pressure cooking.—-Most dry
beans and whole peas can be fully
cooked in a pressure cooker in less
than 30 minutes after soaking;
This length of time allows pres-
sure to rise and fall slowly and
cooks these vegetables evenly
without breaking the skins,
Follow these directions for
soaking and pressure cooking dry
beans and whole peas:
* Add 2 cups water for each
cup of beans or peas, boil 2 min -
utes, and soak 1 hour before cook-
ing.
14
* Fill pressure cooker no more
than one-third full of food and
water. If cooker is too full, food
may clog vent tube and cause an
explosion.
* Add 1 tablespoon fat to re-
duce foaming
1
, and 1 teaspoon salt
per cup of dry bearss or peas,
* Put lid on pressure cooker,.
Follow manufacturer's directions
for exhausting" cooker and brk\\f •
ing pressure up to 1.5 pounds,
© Cook vegetables at 15 pounds
pressure as follows:
3 minutes — Great Northern
beans, kidney beans, large lima
beans, and whole peas.
5 minutes - •• black beans and
cranberry beans.
5 to 10 minutes—navy (pea)
beans,
10 minutes—pinto beans,
* Remove cooker from heat.
Let pressure drop gradually.
Yield of cooked vegetable will
be the same as for boiled vege-
table,.
Lentils
Lentlih nniy be cooked without
V M « te.v^jniHt ,-' iR Ic* the ujok-

41
fjr \\v^ttv
f
oi ?adi '*up of lentils.
Cover, boil gently until done, See
ty iling gyp 1° below,
Spilt Peas
Soaking.
—-Soaking split peas
helps retain, their shape, Follow
the boiling guide below for
amount of water to use, Boil for
2 minutes. Then soak */2 hour.
Split peas used In soup do not
need to be soaked before cooking.
Boiling, —Add. % teaspoon salt
for each cop of split peas, cover,
and boil gently without stirring:
Boiling Guide for Dry Beans, Peas, and Lentils
1
Vegetable (1 c u p ) Amount Approximate
of water boiling time
Black beans ., _. __
Blackeye beans (blackey
1
p<Ld,~,
Cranberry beans _ _ _ _
Great Northern beans _ -
Kidney beans _ _ _
Lenti 1 s _ -
Lima beans, large
Lima beans, smal 1 _- _- -
Navy (pea) beans
Peas,
whole .__ - _ - _ - _
Pinto beans - .,.,.
Soybeans _ _ _ _. .
Split peas _
Cups
3
2%
3
2V
2
3
2
3
4
2
Yield
Hours
2 _..._
14
2
1 to
l
J

.
2
t,[,
Cups
2
2%
2
2%
2%
2
2V2
2%
2%
2%
2%
:
See soaking; directions TUT
iinrt of vepetfiblo b c f o r v cool- in/?.
for the time recommended in the
guide.
Baking,,—You can bake split
peas after soaking, Add % tea-
spoon salt for each cup of peas.
Place in baking dish, cover, and
bake at 350° P. (Moderate oven) .
for 35 minutes,
NOTE: Pressure cooking Is'not
advised for split peas because
they may splatter and clog* the
cooker vent.
Tips
Cooked dry beans, peas
?
and
lentils may be seasoned and eaten
without further preparation, or
they may be baked or combined
with other foods.
If acid Ingredients like toma-
toes, catsup, or vinegar are in-
cluded in the recipe, add them
after the vegetables are tender.
Acids prevent 'beans and peas
from softening.
SEASONINGS AND SAUCES
Spices and Herbs
Discover how spices and herbs
can lift humdrum vegetable dishes
out of the ordinary. For suggested
ways to successfully combine veg-
etables with spices and herbs, see
page. 17.
Spices and herbs must be used
sparingly or they overpower,
rather than enhance, the natural
flavor of vegetables. One-fourth
to 1/2 teaspoon, of most dried
spices and herbs' is enough for 2
cups of vegetable.
The term, "spices," as generally
used, includes the herbs as well as
true spices, Herbs are leaves and
sometimes the flowers of aromatic
plants grown, in the Temperate
Zone; spices come from aromatic
plants grown in the Tropics,
r3ried herbs are more concen-
trated than fresh herbs, Use about
i/i teaspoon of a dried herb for
2 cups of Vegetable and add it at
beginning of cooking period. With
fresh herbs, increase to about %
to 1 teaspoon for 2 cups of vege-
table, 'Chop herbs very fine to
allow some of the flavoring oils
to escape. Heat chopped herbs
in melted butter and add to vege-
table after it has been cooked.
Sauces In Variety
It's simple to make sauces that
add variety and distinction to veg-
etable dishes. Often the right
sauce gives contrast in color, fla-
vor, and texture. From a basic
white sauce you can concoct many
pleasing sauces to serve over
cooked vegetables or in scalloped
vegetables.
Thin white sauce is usually pre-
ferred with starchy vegetables
like peas or lima beans; medium
white sauce with other vegeta-
bles.
How to make white sayce
For a smooth white sauce, blend
the flour with fat or cold liquid;
then combine with remaining
liquid, stirring .constantly over
low heat until thickened. For
amounts of ingredients, see table
on page 18.
Give Vegetables a Gourmet Touch With
SPICES AND HERBS
VegetaBIe Spice or herb
1
Asparagus Mustard seed> sesame seed, or tarragon.
Beans, lima Marjoram, oregano, sage, savory, tarragon, or
thyme.
Beans,
snap Basil, dill, marjoram, mint, mustard seed, ore-
gano,, savory, tarragon, or thyme,
Beets Allspice, bay leaves, caraway seed, cloves, dill,
ginger, mustard seed, savory, or thyme,
Broccoli Caraway seed, dill, mustard seed, or tarragon,
Brussels sprouts Basil, caraway seed, dill, mustard seed, sage, or
thyme.
Cabbage Caraway seed, celery seed, dill, mint, mustard
seed, nutmeg, savory, or tarragon.
Carrots Allspice, bay leaves, caraway seed, dill, fennel,
ginger, mace, marjoram, .mint, nutmeg, or
thyme.
Cauliflower Caraway seed, celery salt, dill, mace, or tarragon.
Cucumbers Basil, dill, mint, or tarragon.
Eggplant Marjoram or oregano.
Onions Caraway seed, mustard seed, nutmeg, oregano,
sage, or thyme.
Peas Basil, dill, marjoram, mint, oregano, poppy seed,
rosemary, sage, or savory.
Potatoes Basil, bay leaves, caraway seed, celery seed, dill,
chives, mustard seed, oregano, poppy seed, or
thyme.
Salad greens Basil, chives, dill, or tarragon.
Spinach Basil, mace, marjoram, nutmeg, or oregano.
Squash Allspice, basil, cinnamon, cloves, fennel, ginger,
mustard seed, nutmeg, or rosemary.
Sweetpotatoes Allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, or nutmeg,,
Tomatoes _. Basil, bay leaves, celery seed, oregano, sage,
sesame seed, tarragon, or thyme.
1
Pepper and parsley may be added to any of the above vegetables. Curry powder
is good with creamed vegetables.
17
Fat may be • omitted if white
sauce is to be used, in cream soups,
casseroles, or other recipes where
fat is not needed for 'flavor or
texture,
Variations of white sauce
Certain vegetables are en-
hanced by special sauces. The
following variations of white
sauce taste particularly good with
the vegetables mentioned.
Cheese sauce (asparagus, broc-
coli, cabbage, cauliflower, pota-
toes, and summer squash), Cook
1 cup of thin or medium white
sauce,. Remove sauce from heat;
stir in 1 cup shredded Cheddar
cheese. Blend well.
Mock hollandaise so/uee (aspar-
agus and broccoli). Make 1 cup
of medium white sauce. Beat 2
egg yolks, stir a little hot white
sauce into them, and stir mixture
into rest of sauce. Stir in 2 table-
spoons butter or margarine. Cook
over hot water about 1 minute.
Remove from heat and, stir in 1
tablespoon lemon juice,, Serve at
once,
NOTE: In this t -ecipe use only
clean eggs with no cracks in shell.
Mushroom sauce (asparagus,
green, beans, and peas),, Use pro-
portions of fat and flour for 1 cup
of medium white sauce,, Cook 1
cup small whole or sliced fresh or
canned mushrooms in fat. Add
flour. Use liquid from canned
mushrooms to replace part of
milk.
Onion or celei y sauce (carrots,,
green beans, and peas),,. Use pro-
portions of fat and flour for I cup
of thin,, white sauce. Cook */2 cup
finely chopped onion or celery in
the fat until tender, stir in flour
and, salt, and slowly blend, in
liquid. Cook over low heat stirring
constantly until thickened, Add 1
teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
before serving;
for
1
of \\Vht1t Settee
Ingredients
Measure
Thin sauce
Standard Low-fat
1
Vegetable liquid may be used in place of par
11
a
Use skim milk or reconstituted nonfat dry m
Butter or other
fat 1 tablespoon 2 teaspoons
All-purpose
flour
... 1 tablespoon,. . 1 tablespooi
Salt _..._ *4 teaspoon
l
,i teaspoon _
Milk 1 cup
1
1 cup
1 2
. . _
Calories In 1 cup
white sauce _ 290 _. , 180 _ _ _ .
IV!f'diuni s iiirp
F mv-fat
1 t^blespf»oP
f
i lea spoon.
1 cup.
1
?
18
LIVELY LEFTOVERS
A bit of imagination can trans-
form leftover vegetables into new,
interesting
1
dishes. Try cold left-
over vegetables In egg, meat,,
gelatin, or tossed green salads.
Add them to soups or casseroles.
Or combine yesterday's corn or
snap beans with today's lima
beans.
Actually, you can use leftover
vegetables in any recipe that calls
for cooked vegetables. Cream-
scallop—glaze—or fry them as
you would freshly cooked vegeta-
bles, or puree them to make cream
soups.
Tomatoes add extra juiciness
and flavor to meat loaves and
ground meat patties. Dry beans
• extend meat proteins in money-
saving combination dishes. And
most families enjoy hearty vege-
table soups and meat and vege-
table stews.
RECIPES
Besides Its accustomed place on
the family dinner plate, the versa-
tile vegetable appears in main
dishes, soups, and salads. The
recipes that follow feature vege-
tables in each of these categories.
Because more and more persons
are calorie conscious, ways of re-
ducing" calorie value are sug-
gested for some of the recipes.
Calorie values per serving are
given for all recipes.
Most vegetables served alone
contain few calories, but added
ingredients often boost the calorie
content.
Those who are watching cal-
ories may want to use low-fat
white sauce in place of standard
sauce (see p. 18). Substantial
savings In calories can come from
use of low-calorie salad dressings
in place of regular dressing. Other
ways to cut down calories in veg-
etable dishes are to use skim milk
or reconstituted nonfat dry milk
in place of whole milk and to re-
duce slightly the amount of fat
used mainly for flavor.
Vegetable Dishes
Diily carrots and beans
6 servings, i/£ cup each
Water ..................... % cup
Sugar ..................... 1 teaspoon
Salt !6 teaspoon
Dill seed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . !/i teaspoon
Green snap beans, fresh . . . . . .
1
/2 pound
Carrots, medium-size 4
Italian dressing ¥4 cup
Combine, water, sugar, salt, and
dill seed in a saucepan, bring to
boiling.
Wash and trim green beans;
leave whole. Add to boiling water.
Simmer 5 minutes.
Cut carrots into thin strips, 2
to 3 inches long. Add to green
beans.
Boil until both vegetables are
tender and liquid is almost evapo-
rated—about

10 minutes.
19

Add Italian dressing and toss
to mix well.
Serve hot, or chill and use in
tossed vegetable salads.
Calories per serving.—About
80.
For fewer calories, use low-
calorie Italian dressing. About 30
calories per serving.
Orange-honeyed acorn squash
6 servings, '/a squash each
Acorn squoih 3 imoll
Orange juice frozen concen-
trate 2 tableipooni
Honey !4 cup
Salt 1 teaspoon
Butter or margarine 2 tableipooni
Nutmeg, if desired !i teaspoon
Preheat oven to 400° F. (hot).
Cut squash in half. Remove
seeds. Place squash halves in a
shallow baking pan.
Combine orange juice concen-
trate, honey, and salt. Mix well.
Put some of the orange-honey
mixture into each squash cavity.
Add 1 teaspoon fat to each
squash half. Sprinkle with nut-
meg, if desired.
Cover pan tightly with alumi-
num foil to keep steam in and
speed cooking.
Bake 30 minutes.
Remove foil and continue bak-
ing 30 minutes more, or until
squash is tender.
Calories per serving.—About
160.
•N-S1620
If you like vegetables with zippy flavor, you'll enjoy menicon panned corn (left) and dilly
carrots and beans (right).
20
Mexican panned corn
6" servings, ife
CU
P
Bacon . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . , . . 3 slices
Bacon drippings . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 tablespoon
Onion, chopped . . . . . . . . . . . . . % cup
Corn, drained, vacuum packed,, 2 cans, 12
ounces each
Green pepper, finely chopped . % cup
Olives, stuffed green,, chopped. , 14 cup
Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . I teaspoon
Fry bacon until crisp. Drain, on
paper.
Cook onion in bacon drippings
just until tender,,
Add corn, green pepper, olives,
an.fl salt.
Heat through, stirring- con™
stantly.
Crumble bacon over corn.
Calories per serving.— About
Vegetable medley
6 servings, ^fe cup each
Turnips, diced .............. 2 cups
Carrots, sliced or diced ....... 1 cup
Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vfc cup
Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vi teaspoon
Green peas, fresh . . . . . . . . . . . 1 cup
Buffer or margarine . . . . . . . . . 2 tablespoons
Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . !4 teaspoon
Pepper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vs teaspoon
Cook turnips and carrots for
10 minutes in boiling water with
1/2 teaspoon salt added.
Add. peas arid cook until they
are tender, about 5 to 7 minutes.
Drain.
Season with butter or marga-
rine, salt, and pepper..
NOTE: Frozen peas can be "used
in place of fresh peas. Add loose
frozen peas when the other vege-
tables are nearly tender and cook
only until peas are tender.
Calories per serving, — About
75.
Eggplant-tomato casserole
6 servings, % cup each
Onion, chopped . . . ..... . . . . . 1 large
Eggplants,, peeled and diced . , 2 small
Butter or margarine . . . . . . . . . !4 cup
Tomatoes, drained . . . . . . . . . . . 28-ounce can
Salt . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 teaspoon
Pepper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 teaspoon
Corn flake crumbs . . . . . . . . . . . !4 cup
Preheat oven to 350° F. (mod-
erate) .
Cook onion and eggplant in fat
until golden brown.
Add. tomatoes, salt, and pepper.
Mix thoroughly,,
Pour into casserole and. top
with the crumbs.
Bake 30 minutes.
Calories per serving,— About
Summer squash bake
6 servings, % cup each.
Summer squash, sliced . . . . . . . . 1 quart
Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ¥2 cup
Salt ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 teaspoon
Medium white sauce . . . . . . . . . 1 cup
Eggs,, beaten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Process Cheddar cheese,,
shredded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vfc cup
Breadcrumbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . !/2 cup
Preheat oven to 350° F. (mod-
erate),
Grease a life-quart casserole.
Cook squash in boiling, salted
water for 5 minutes. Drain and
use vegetable liquid to make the
white sauce,
21
Make standard white sauce ac-
cording to directions on page 16.
Mix squash with white sauce
and eggs.
Place mixture in casserole.
Sprinkle cheese and crumbs
over the top.
Bake for 25 minutes.
Calories per serving.—About
185.
Quick candied sweetpotatoes
6 servings
Brown sugar . , . . „ , !/2 cup, packed
Sirup from sweetpotatoes . . . . . Vz cup
Salt Vi teaspoon
Cinnamon . . .
Dash
Butter or margarine 2 tablespoons
Sweetpotatoes, drained . . . . . . . 23-ounce can
Combine all ingredients except
sweetpotatoes.
Cook over low heat for 5 min-
utes.
Add sweetpotatoes and cook 15
to 20 minutes, turning occasion-
ally.
Calories per serving.—About
220.
Wilted spinach
6 servings, % cup each
Bacon, cut in 16-inch pieces . . . . 3 slices
Flour . 2 tablespoons
Sugar ..................... 1 tablespoon
Salt , 1 teaspoon
Bacon drippings 2 tablespoons
Water % cup
Vinegar % cup
Spinach, raw, coarsely chopped. 1 quart
Fry bacon pieces until crisp.
Drain bacon and save drip-
pings.
Blend flour, sugar, salt, and 2
tablespoons bacon drippings.
Stir in water and vinegar and
cook until thickened, stirring con-
stantly.
Pour hot dressing over spinach.
Add bacon.
Toss to mix*
NOTE: Half of a 10-ounce pack-
age of trimmed fresh spinach may
be used,
Calories per serving.—About
95.
Chinese-style cauliflower
6 servings, % cup each
Cauliflower florets,, thinly sliced, I head
Salt . . .• 1 teaspoon
Water, hot . . . , . . . . . . , . , , , , , . "A cup
Butter or margarine . . . . . . . . . . 2 tablespoons
Cream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 tablespoons
Chives or parsley, cut-up . . . . . . As desired
Place cauliflower in 'heavy pan,
sprinkle with salt, a n d ' add. hot
water.
Cook covered about 5 minutes
or until slightly crisp.
Add fat and cream.
Heat for 1 or 2 minutes longer.
Garnish with cut-up chives or
parsley.
Calories per serving .—
50.
Cabbage cooked in milk
6 servings, i/i &u>P each each
Cabbage, shredded .......... 1 quart
Milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IVicups
Flour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. , 2 tablespoons
Fat, melted . . 2 tablespoons
Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 teaspoon
Pepper .................... Dash
22
Add. cabbag-e to milk and sim
mer for 2 minutes.
Mix the flour and fat and add
a little of the hot milk.
Stir into cabbage and, cook for
8 or 4 minutes until thickened,
stirring constantly.
Season with salt and pepper,
Calories per serving.—About
95,
Beets with orange sauce
8 servings, ^,4 cup each
Sugar „ „ . . , , , . . , , , . , „ , ,«, , .. , !4 cup
Salt . . . , , , . . „ . . , , „ . , „ . , . . , .
;
;4 teaspoon
Corrsstorch . , , „ , ,. ,, „ . „ , „ » , . , 2 tablespoons
Orange juice . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . "!4 cup
Lemon juice . . . . . . , . ., „ , 2 tablespoons
Butter or margarine , . , „ , „ , , . 1 tablespoon
Beefs,, cooked or canned, sliced,,
drained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 cups
"Mix
ju i
T
i f
4
f n; n> cuxh
«k unt * h J
f
kt ii ^c I
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i
m i v e ^10 i
hi U i i u i i < J U T i <iU
i 1 1 1 H i
III
L '!> H*
i
& i «jt i M*ri'
lom* JL^I *>t>n tiiy --Abuul
Chinese-style mushrooms
6 servings, y$ cup each
Mushrooms, fresh » , „ . . , . „ 1 pound
Vegetable oil . . . . . . „ . , ,. , ,. , , , 2 Tablespoons
Soy sauce . ., , . . . ., , , „ , . . , . „ , 2 tablespoons
Wafer . . . . . . . . , . , . , . , , . . : . . 2 tablespoons
Sugar „ , , , . . „ „ . , „ , „ „ , , „ , , « , „ „ „ ,,, 1 teaspoon
Cornsfarch ,. . , . .„, „ „ , . , .., „ . „ , „ 1 tablespoon
Wash mushrooms and cut into
thin slices.
Cook mushrooms in hot oil In
frypan for 3 minutes, stirring as
needed.
Combine other Ingredients and
stir into mushrooms.
Cook 2 minutes or until sauce
is clear.
Calories per serving.—-About
70.
Potato patties
6 servings, 2 patties each
Potatoes, raw, shredded . . . . . . 2 cups
Egg, beaten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , * 1
Onion, grated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 tablespoons
F;our , , „ „ , , , , , "I tablespoon
Salt . . - , . . « . . . . . . . . . . . . „ , , . „ V"2 teaspoon
Fat or oil . . . . . . ,. . . . . . „ .. . , . .. 2 tablespoons
Mix shredded potatoes with
egg, onion, flour, and salt.
' Drop from tablespoon into hot
fat m fi vpaii
Fiy jin b r t h -idt ^ unt
1
! crisp.
f V? ' ( ) ' ' £ ( s pi )> s
(
2
T
inn. About
Luncheon or Supper
Main Leslies
Potato-cheese btike
6 servings, 1. cup each
Onion, 'Finely chopped Vz smcili
Eggs,, beater? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . % cup
Mashed potatoes, seasoned . „ , . 3 cups
Process Cheddar cheese, coarsely
shredded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 cups
Preheat oven to 375° F\\ (mod-
erate),
Mix all ingredients.
Pour into baking pan.
Bake 50 minutes or until the
blade of a knife inserted in the
center comes out clean.
Serve at once,,
Calories per serving,—-About
295.
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with tuna-stuffed tomato
salad. Have fruit pie for dessert.
Spinach souffle
6' servings, 1 cup each
Spinach,, frozen, chopped . . . . . 10-ounce
package
Butter or margarine . . . . . . . . . 14 cup
Fiour, unsifted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . % cup
Milk . . . » I c u p
Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 teaspoon
Pepper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VB teaspoon
Process Cheddar cheese,
shredded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 cup
Egg yolks, beaten slightly . . . . . 4
Cream of tartar . . . . . . . . . . . . . '/a teaspoon
£99 whites . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Preheat oven to 375° F. (mod-
erate).
Grease a 2-quart casserole,
Thaw frozen spinach.
Melt fat and stir in flour.
Add milk, salt and pepper.
Cook, stirring" constantly, until
thickened.
Add cheese and cook until
melted,,
Stir a little of the hot mixture
into egg yolks; then stir yolks into
rest of hot mixture and cook 1
minute longer.
Add spinach and stir,
Add cjeam of tartar to egg
whites and beat until stiff -but not
dry.
Fold egg whites into spinach
mixture.
Pour into greased baking
1
dish
and, bake for 30 minutes or until
done.
Souffle is done when a knife in-
serted in center comes out clean.
Calories per serving.— About
250.
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with cold sliced roast beef
and, tomato wedges on lettuce.
Have fruit cup for dessert.
Baked beans
8 servings, % cup each
Dry navy (pea) beans ........ 2 cups
Water ....... ..... ......... 6 cups
Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 teaspoon
Salt pork,, cut in pieces . . . . . . . 14 pound
Molasses ................... V* cup
Dry mustard ..... ........... % teaspoon
Soak dry beans in water as di-
rected on page 14.
Add salt.
Simmer beans 45 minutes in
soaking water.
Add salt pork.
Boil gently 30 to 45 minutes
longer, or until beans are tender.
Preheat oven to 350° P. (mod-
erate) .
Mix molasses and mustard.
Stir mixture into beans.
Put beans into a beanpot or 2-
quart casserole.
Bake 1 hour or until tender and
lightly browned on top. Check
beanpot from time to time and
add a little hot water if beans
seem
Calo-ries per serving.— About
405.
NOTE; Dry soybeans may be
used In place of navy beans. Cook
24
soybeans until tender before bak-
ing them. Bake the beans in a
covered casserole for 2 hours, re-
moving the cover the last 30 min-
utes to brown the top. About 460
calories per serving.
VARIATIONS
• Place a peeled onion in the
bottom of the beanpot or stir y%
cup chopped onion into the beans
before baking. About 410 cal-
ories per serving.
• Add 14 cup catsup, 1 table-
spoon. Worcestershire sauce, and
y% teaspoon ginger. About 415
calories per serving.
• Use brown sugar or maple
sirup in place of molasses. About
405 calories per serving.
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with Harvard beets, Bos-
ton brown bread, and corn relish.
Have blueberries and a cookie for
dessert.
Chili beanburgers
6 sandwiches
Onion, chopped . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Garlic .....................
Fat or oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kidney beans, canned, drained.
Ground beef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Egg, beaten ....... .........
SaSf ........... . ..... ......
Chili powder ...... ..... .....
Catsup ....................
Worcestershire sauce ....
Hamburger rolls, toasted
Process Cheddar cheese ..
Preheat oven to 350°
erate).
2 tablespoons
1 Vfc cloves
4 teaspoons
114 cups
% pound
1
V/2 teaspoons
1 teaspoon
I Vfe table-
spoons
3
/4 teaspoon
6
6 1 -ounce
slices
F. (mod-
Brown onion and garlic lightly
in the fat. Remove garlic.
Combine browned onion, beans,
beef, egg, salt, chili powder,
catsup, and Worcestershire sauce;
mix well.
Divide mixture into six patties
and place in shallow baking pan.
Bake until well done, about 30
minutes,
Reduce oven temperature to
300° F. (slow).
Place patties on lower halves
of toasted rolls.
Top each patty with a slice of
cheese and cover with top of roll.
Heat just until the cheese melts,
Serve immediately.
NOTE: Canned soybeans may
be used in place of canned kidney
beans.
Calories per serving.—About
390.
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with potato chips, celery
and carrot strips, and baked
apples.
Lima bean casserole
6 servings, % cup each
Milk . . . . . & cup
Cheese soup, condensed ...... lOVi-ounce
can
Celery, diced .... 1 cup
Parsley, finely chopped . . . . . . . !4 cup
Fordhook or baby lima beans,
frozen,, cooked 10-ounc©
package
French fried onion rings ...... 3Mz-ounce
can
Preheat oven to 350° F. (mod-
erate) ,
Grease a iy%-quart casserole.
Blend milk and soup.
Add celery, parsley^ and lima
beans.
Place mixture in casserole.
Top with onion rings.
Bake 45 minutes.,
Calories per 'Serving.—About
155,
MENU SUGGESTION
S-erve with cold sliced ham and
vegetable relishes. Have layer
cake for dessert.
Quick-stuffed green peppers
6* servings, y% pepper each
Green peppers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 large
Boiling water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To cover
peppers
Onion, chopped , , . % cup
Butter or margarine . . . . . . . . . ' . 2 tablespoons
Horseradish, prepared /. , . . . . . 1 tablespoon
• Corned-beef hash ............ 2 cans, 16
ounces each
Wafer , ? cup
Preheat oven to 375° F. (mod-
erate),
Cut peppers in half. Remove
seeds,
Cook for 10 minutes in boiling
water. Drain.
Cook onion in the fat just until
tender.
Stir in the horseradish.
Mix with the hash,
Fill pepper halves with the
hash mixture.
Place peppers in baking dish.
Pour in 1 cup of water and bake
for SO minutes,
Calories per serving,'-—About
830,
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with orange, banana, and
walnut salad. Have Boston, cream
pie for dessert.
Soups and Chowders
Split pea soyp with franks
6 servings, 1 cup each
Dry split peas . ..... ........ VAt cups
Onion,, chopped . . . . . . . . . . . . . V2 cup
Salt , , 1 teaspoon
Pepper .................... Va teaspoon
Water 5 cups
Frankfurters, finely chopped . , , MK pound
Buffer or margarine . . . . . . . . . 1 tablespoon
Simmer peas, onion, salt, and
pepper in water 20 to SO minutes
until peas are tender.
Lightly brown the frankfurters
in fat in a frypan; add to soup.
Simmer 5 minutes longer to
blend flavors.
Calories per serving.—About
315.
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with tossed vegetable
salad and hot french bread. Have
peach cobbler for dessert,
Potato soyp
6 servings, 1 cup each
Onion, chopped . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 large
Butter or margarine . . . . . . . . . 2 tablespoons
Potatoes, cut in small pieces , ., 5 large
Water ..................... 1 cup
Milk .. . 3 cups
Salt , 2 teaspoons
Pepper . , . . . . . , , . . . . . „ . , „ . . . To tasto
Cook onion in fat until tender.
Add potatoes and water.
26

Boil gently, covered, for 15
minutes, or until potatoes are
tender.
Mash potatoes.
Add milk and seasonings.
Heat slowly to serving tempera-
ture, stirring occasionally to pre-
vent sticking.
Calories per serving.—About
200.
Bean chowder
6 servings, % cup each
Dry navy (pea) beam % cup
Water 4 cups
Salt 1 Vi teaspoons
Potato, diced
3
< cup
Onion, chopped Vt cup
Flour 1 Vi teaspoons
Butter, margarine, or drippings. 1 tablespoon
Tomatoes, canned % cup
Green pepper, finely chopped. . 16 cup
Milk 114 cups
Soak beans in water as directed
on page 14.
Add salt.
Boil, covered, until almost done,
about 1 hour.
Add potato and onion; cook 30
minutes more.
Mix flour with the fat.
Stir into bean mixture.
Add tomatoes and green pepper.
Cook over low heat 10 minutes,
stirring constantly until thick-
ened, then occasionally to avoid
scorching.
Stir in the milk.
Heat to serving temperature.
Calories per serving.—About
170.
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with apple and celery
salad; have baked custard for
dessert.
Bean chowder—delectable and hearty on a cold winter day.
BN-21623
27
i
Chicken gumbo
6' servings, 1 cup each
Tomatoes, canned .... ........ ¥2 cup
Celery, thinly sliced . . . . . . . . . . ¥2 cup
Green pepper, thinly sliced ... ¥2 cup
Onion, thinly sliced .....;,... ¥2 cup
Parsley, finely chopped . . . . . . . 1 tablespoon
Chicken bouillon cubes ..... , . . 4
Chicken broth . . . . . . . ...... . . 4 cups
Chicken, cooked, diced ....... 2 cups
Okra, frozen, cut-up ........... 10-ounce
package
Rice, cooked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ¥2 cup
Corn, cooked . ..... ......... ¥2 cup
Add tomatoes, celery, green
pepper, onion, parsley, and bouil-
lon cubes to chicken broth.
Simmer 24 minutes or until
vegetables are tender.
Add chicken and okra and cook
for 6 minutes longer.
Add rice and corn,
Heat and serve.
Calories per serving.— About
155.
Quick french onion soup
6 servings, . 1/2 cup each
Bread cubes . . . . . . . ..... . . . . 1 cup
Onions, thinly sliced .......... 2 cups
Fat or oil ... ...... ... ...... 2 tablespoons
Boiling water . . . . . ......... . 3 cups
Beef bouillon cubes . . . . . . . . . . 4
Butter or margarine, melted... 1 tablespoon
Parmesan or blue cheese, grated 2 tablespoons
Toast bread cubes in a 325° F.
oven (slow) until they are com-
pletely dried out and lightly
browned.
Brown onions lightly in fat.
Combine boiling water and
bouillon cubes in a 2-quart sauce-
pan, Add onions. Simmer, covered,
until onions are tender, about 15
minutes.
Toss toasted bread cubes with
fat and cheese and sprinkle on top
of soup just before serving.
Calories per serving,—About
90.
EASY METHOD
Use 1/2 cup instant minced onion
instead of fresh onions; increase
water to 4 cups* Instant onion
can be browned without fat.
Salads
Vegetable salads may be a col-
orful combination, of several raw
vegetables-—a mixture of raw and
cooked or canned, vegetables—or
a teaming up of vegetables and
fruits.
You can make a hearty main
dish salad by adding cubes or
julienne strips of cooked meat or
poultry to a vegetable salad.
Flaked cooked or canned fish
gently mixed with vegetables in
a salad can also be a main dish
in the meal. Vary your salads by
using different greens—icebfirg,
bibb, or leaf lettuce—romaine,
endive, escarole, spinach, water-
cress, Chinese cabbage, or celery
tops.
To make attractive tossed sal-
ads, tear greens into pieces large
enough to give body to salad, but
small enough to eat easily. Drain
greens after washing to prevent
sogginess. Add tomatoes at last
minute—they tend to thin the
salad dressing.
28

Spinach-orange-avocado salad
6 servings, 1 cup each
Spinach, fresh, trimmed, washed,
torn in small pieces 1 quart
Mandarin orange sections,
canned, drained 2 cans, 11
ounces each
Avocado, diced 1 cup
French dressing 14 cup
Combine all ingredients; toss
lightly.
Chill. Serve within an hour or
two.
NOTE : Half of a 10-ounce pack-
age of trimmed fresh spinach may
be used.
Calories per serving.—About
130.
For fewer calories, use low-
calorie french dressing. About
90 calories per serving.
Mixed vegetable salad
6 servings,
l
/z cup each
Mixed vegetables, frozen 10-ounce
package
Celery, thinly sliced % cup
Green pepper, diced V* cup
Sweet pickle, finely chopped . . ' < cup
Cucumber, diced V* cup
Onion, finely chopped 1 tablespoon
French dressing */t cup
lettuce Several leaves
Cook vegetables as directed on
the package until they are barely
tender. Drain and chill vegetables.
Combine vegetables and all in-
gredients except lettuce.
Chill at least 1 hour to blend
flavors.
Serve on lettuce.
NOTE: Leftover cooked or
canned vegetables may be substi-
tuted for frozen mixed vegetables.
BN-21612
For a salad with pleasing texture and flavor, combine raw spinach leaves, tangy orange slices,
and creamy avocado.
Use 11/2 to 2 cups of two or more
vegetables (peas, carrots, corn,
lima beans, cut green beans).
Calories per serving.—About
90,
For fewer calories, use low-
calorie french dressing. About
50 calories per serving.
Peo and cheese salad
8 servings, y% cup each
Peas, frozen, cooked, drained.. ID-ounce
package
Process Cheddar cheese, diced.. 1 cup
Dili pickle/ chopped . . . . . . . . . ¥4 cup
Mayonnaise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vi cup
Prepared mustard . . . . . . . . . . . ¥2 teaspoon
Vinegar .................... 1 teaspoon
Salt To taste
Lettuce .................... Several leaves
Mix peas with cheese, dill
pickle, mayonnaise, mustard, vin-
egar, and salt.
Chill and serve on lettuce.
Calories per serving.—About
220,
MENU SUGGESTION
Serve with tomato soup and po-
tato chips. Have fresh fruit for
dessert.
Jellied vegetable salad
6 servings, y% cup each
Lemon flavored gelatin ....... 3-ounce
package
Unfavored gelatin ........... 1 teaspoon
Boiling water 1 cup
Cold water , 1 cup
Onion, finely chopped "5 teaspoont
Salt .......................
!
/2 teaspoon
Green pepper, chopped . . . . . . % cup
Carrots, shredded ........... % cop
Celery, diced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V4 cup
Radishes, thinly sliced ........ 14 cup
lettuce .................*.. Several leaves
Combine flavored and unfla-
vored gelatin.
Dissolve in boiling water.
Add cold water, onion, and salt.
Chill in refrigerator until mix-
ture begins to thicken.
Gently stir in green pepper,
carrots, celery, and radishes.
Pour into a 1-quart mold or six
individual molds.
Chill until set.
Unmold by dipping the mold in
a pan of warm water for a few
seconds.
Serve on lettuce.
Calories per serving.—About
60,
Corn-stuffed tomato salad
6 servings, 1 tomato each
Tomatoes , ,. ... 6 medium
Whole-kernel corn, canned/
drained 1V4 cups
Green onions, chopped ....... % cup
Green pepper, chopped ....... % cup
Salt . . . , , - . Vz teaspoon
Vegetable oil V-4 cup
Lemon juice or vinegar ....... 1 tablespoon
Garlic clove, minced . . . . . . . . . 1 small
or
Garlic powder V&
teaspoon
Lettuce or salad greens ....... Several leaves
Spoon out centers of tomatoes.
Chill.
Mix with corn, onions, green
peppers, and salt.
Combine vegetable oil, lemon
juice or vinegar, and garlic,
Pour over mixed vegetables,
Chill mixture.
Spoon into chilled tomato cups.
Serve on salad greens.,
Calories per serving.—About
190.
30
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
The following publications give additional Information on buying and preparing
food for your family. Single copies are available from the Office of Communica-
tion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, B.C. 20250. Include your ZIP
Code number in your return address,,
HG 103, "Eggs in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers.*'
HG 110, "Poultry in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers."
HG 112, "Cheese in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers."
HG 118, "'Beef and Veal in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers."
HG 124, "Lamb in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers."
HG 125, "Fruits in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers."
HG 127, '"Milk in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers."
HG 150, "Cereals and Pasta in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers/'
1
*
HG 160, "Pork in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers."
HG 176, "Nuts in .Family Meals; A Guide for Consumers."
HG 208, "Soybeans in Family Meals,"
INDEX TO RECIPES
;
Beam's) j dry:
baked _ __ ._ 24
burgers, chili _ _ - _.. 25
cho wder -_. _ - .._ 27
Bean, lima, casserole _._ „„ 25
Beans (green snap), diily,, with
carrots _ _ - _ - „ 19
Beets with orange sauce 23
Cabbage cooked in milk ._ 22
Carrots, dilly, with beans __ 10
Cauliflower, Chinese-style 22
Chicken gumbo soup _ 28
Corn:
Mexican panned _. _ _ .._ 21
-stuffed tomato salar - 30
Eggplant-tomato casserole 21
Mushrooms, Chinese-style _ - 23
Onion soup, quick French - _. 28
Pea (split) soup with, franks ._ 26
Pea (green) and cheese salad .. SO
Peppers, quick-stuffed green
Potato:
-cheese bake
pa ttl e s ,.
soup - , _...
Spinach:
-orange-avocado salad •
souffle _ _ . _
"wilted _ _ __ ,„
Squash, summer, bake
S qu a s h,. a c o rn, or an ge- h on eye d
Sweetpotatoes, quick-candied __
Tomato:
casserole, -with eggplant _
salad, corn-staffed
Vegetable (s) :
medley - _ -_
salad, jellied - -
salad, mixed _ _ - __
26
23
23
26
29
24
22
21
20
22
21
30
3
See also Contents page for listings of general'cooking
1
methods and vegetable
seasonings and sauces.
U.S.
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1974 0^-548-410
33
/v,
of US DA